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Power connector Identification Help ?

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Jimbo1975

New Member
Hello All,

Thanks for this fantastic site Im glad I came across it in my hour of need.

I need help to identify the pictured connector for replacement. I know what some of you may say, use an IEC type connector, which I may do down the line but at the moment Im replacing like for like as cutting the chasis is not possible at the moment. The connector seems to have perished over time and there were originally two bolt tabs either side of the main body holding it to the chasis.
If anyone can help point me in the right direction that would be a great help. Thanks.

Jim.

POWERCONNECTOR.jpg
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Well that what happens when you are old and wrinkly and have been in and out of assorted electronic workshops a few times.

Out of interest, what is the equipment that it is used on?

JimB
 

Jimbo1975

New Member
Thanks again, Jim. Im reconditioning a solid piece of British Sound engineering a 12-8-2 mk 2 MTR recording desk. As far as I found out many of these desks were modified right away to decrease grounding hum and I think this connector was a result of that (Ive seen a few desks with different methods of power and connection). Whoever did the modification moved the internal transformer outside the unit (still ac240v to 15v), put it in an external box, modified some of the internal wiring (just re-routed switches and fuses) and used one of the connectors I asked about. However I cant see what the've done that could have taken the grounding hum away all the electronics/ components look pretty standard according to the MTR wiring diagrams. Unless they just wanted to make the desk more portable by adding this externally connected power supply otherwise the unit would have to be carried around with a flying lead.
Eventually Ill replace the crackling sliders and have supply inside the unit without the hum of course. Firstly though Im going to take the unit back to its original wiring to see if it actually had any ground hum and work from there. Any suggestions, tips, pointers most welcome.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Interesting.
Audio is not my "thing" so I cannot really make any sensible suggestions.

Regarding the DIN connector, I am familiar with it as one of the 5 pin variants was used on many radio transceivers in the 1970s and 80s.
I have also seen the connector used for connecting various probes to their display equipment.

JimB
 
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