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plasma 50" tv

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Gerrie

New Member
Hi can some one tell me what is the power output on the main power supply I would like to now the vs and va power is. and is it ac or dc power
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
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You're going to need to provide a LOT more details. What brand is the TV? What model? What is the part number of the power supply?
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
DC output.

If you can't figure that out on your own you are in over your head to a dangerous level already. :(
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
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I agree with TCM, I get the impression you are not very experienced with electronics and you really should not be mucking around inside of mains power supplies.
 

tomizett

Active Member
Output voltage of these power supplies is around the 200V range I think, too, so even the output side could be very dangerous.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Samsung does not give out information. The power supply might look like this. I think there are several different versions.
Most of the board is inside a thick white line. All those parts are ON THE POWER LINE. There will be 110/220 VAC and 360VDC. It will hurt you! To the right and top of the board are safe voltages. It looks like there are more than one output voltage.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
To the right and top of the board are safe voltages.
Sorry Ron, but that's totally wrong :eek:

Plasma sets run off fairly high voltages, and is probably stepped up from 110V mains - so not really 'safe' at all.

As for the original question va and vs are both DC, and their exact values are printed on the label on the PDP (Plasma Display Panel) - it's individual to each PDP, and part of the setting up procedure is to set va and vs to that specified on the label.

A random example has vs at 207V and va at 67V - so 207V isn't exactly 'safe' :D
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
The sets I did design had the back light high voltage supplies (not on the main power supply board).
LCD's are completely different, and the CCFL ones actually had considerably higher voltages (in the low thousands) - but as you say 'usually' separate to the PSU board. There were a few exceptions though, particularity on smaller screens, where the CCFL inverter was sometimes part of the PSU. In fact I'm current sat a few feet away from a Sony KDL-22BX20D (which I gave to my daughter while she was doing her Phd), these were actually manufactured by Beko, and have the inverter on the PSU board.
 

Triode

Active Member
This seems like the kind of thing where you would just want to replace the whole power supply, looks like you can get it for $50 on ebay if they ship to your location. I found another with the same part number for $14

$50 one that specifically lists your TV model (I wouldn't get this one, it costs more and looks kinda dirty)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Power-Suppl...333410?hash=item3f67423b22:g:Uv4AAOSwsTxXkR5U

$14 one of the same model no.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/BN44-00443B...562900?hash=item1ebf7b8814:g:nHsAAOSwOgdYv0NA

If you want to search other places the model number of the power supply for the TV you listed is apparently. BN44-00443B just going off of a Google search for your model number and "power supply"

It's true if you were an expert you could find the blown component and replace it individually. And just in my limited experience of watching people do this it's usually a capacitor. But big caps can be dangerous and you'd have to know how to check one.
 
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