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Piezo buzzer - three leads?

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tony-ellis

New Member
I've been given a piezo buzzer that was purchased probably from Tandy's in the UK (Radio Shack in North America?) some thirty years ago and has never been used. The problem I've got is that it has three leads - red, black and blue. Red and black I understand, does anyone have any idea what the blue lead is for?
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It might be a piezo with a 3rd wire to be connected to the base of a transistor oscillator.
 

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audioguru

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Why don't my thumbnails show as a small picture? Instead they show as a red X.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
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Why don't my thumbnails show as a small picture? Instead they show as a red X.
Your thumbnails show as a small picture on my machine. But I do often have problems with attached pictures showing as a red x. I though it had something to do with the firewall I work through.
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
hi,
I have used 3 wire piezo buzzers , Bk to 0V , Rd to +V [high pitch tone],, Wh to +V [low pitch tone]
 

JuliaKhanam

New Member
The piezoelectric effect is reversible. When you apply a voltage to a crystal, it will flex. When you flex a crystal, it will create a voltage.

I don't think it will make a good bass pickup though. Most piezoelectric crystals only respond well at fairly high frequencies (10KHz or more). The crystal will respond to the attack and decay of each note but not the hold of the note (it will be unable to sustain a voltage because it will not be flexing) so you'll get a hollow, tinny sound. You can try though, maybe it will work, or maybe you'll like that sound.







video game accessories-NDS Accessories
 
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audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Most piezo transducers resonate at 3kHz to 5kHz where they are sensitive. At other frequencies they have low output as a speaker or as a microphone. Look at this Murata piezo transducer's frequency response that is all over the place:
 

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