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PIC's get malfunction

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micropad

Member
Dear All,

I heard that the PIC's get malfunction in ( Get stuck , Reset ,damage ) Industrial environment ( I think magnetic field or Noyce environment) than AVR, for industrial application developments. Totally I do not agree on this statement but can not prove

could anyone please help to disqualify this statement or reason for qualify?

Thanks in advance
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Dear All,

I heard that the PIC's get malfunction in ( Get stuck , Reset ,damage ) Industrial environment ( I think magnetic field or Noyce environment) than AVR, for industrial application developments. Totally I do not agree on this statement but can not prove

could anyone please help to disqualify this statement or reason for qualify?

There are massively larger numbers of PIC's out in use than AVR's, and as far as I'm aware both are exceptionally reliable (certainly PIC's are).

I doubt there's any stats to prove it either way?, but I would imagine such suggestions are simply from people trying to push AVR's over PIC's.
 

tunedwolf

Well-Known Member
Dear All,

I heard that the PIC's get malfunction in ( Get stuck , Reset ,damage ) Industrial environment ( I think magnetic field or Noyce environment) than AVR, for industrial application developments. Totally I do not agree on this statement but can not prove

could anyone please help to disqualify this statement or reason for qualify?

Thanks in advance


Complete nonsense!

Just about any manufacturer's device will perform as expected when and "only when" the surrounding circuitry has been properly designed for the application and dimensioned for the environment in which it is operating. If the device is expected to work in an electrically noisy environment, for example, a motor control application, then the surrounding circuitry has to be designed to cope with that. Proper design of the entire control from the PCB layout onwards, not just the Microcontroller in use, is essential in order to achieve stable operating conditions.

The PIC vs AVR argument will probably rumble on forever, but I have personally used devices from ST, Motorola, Texas Instruments, Hitachi, Arizona Microchip, Intel and Atmel over the years for all manner of industrial control applications. I choose devices that are a best fit in terms of speed, on board peripheral requirements, I/O requirements, memory types and sizes and price and availability. I try not to favour any one particular manufacturer, although I probably use more PIC and Atmel due to available support and price/ availability than any of the others. I have also been using devices from Cypress recently as well. For critical or long life designs, I tend to use devices that are multi-vendor, or where there are several offerings from a few manufacturers that can be substituted for one another.
 

languer

Active Member
If you start questioning the veracity of the argument outside of the source then you're giving credence to it. Why don't you turn the argument around to the source of this information. Whoever is telling you that this is the case, you can ask them to show you the proof. That way the burden is on them to prove to you what they're claiming.
 

Jon Wilder

Active Member
I've been using PICs for a couple of years now, and the ONLY time I've ever had one malfunction was if something in the code or the hardware design wasn't right. Any processor will do that. Other than that I have not had any issues with PIC microcontrollers.

You're never going to find a processor that is "forgiving" or a processor that doesn't have some sort of a learning curve. If you're new to micro's in general, you probably need to focus on learning basic computer science before you can even begin to understand these things.
 
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dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I agree with Mr Wilder.
Theres been a couple of occaisions where I've had a pic on a breadboard without a decoupling cap and wires everywhere and theres been issues with noise esp on the a to d, however that would apply equally to an avr or just about any other processor, the pic does have features to cope with certain issues like the power up timer, brown out detect and watchdog timer, there are also bits that tell the chip the cause of the reset, so even if something causes a software issue the chip programmed correctly can deal with it.
Your source is either incorrect, or maybe this post was meant to cause a stir.
 
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micropad

Member
Dear Jon Wilder,

Thanks for the reply
Could you please advice me, how may I Start to learn basic computer science any link or reference

Thanks in advance
 
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