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PIC Kit 1 - Diffrent Devices

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tom_pay

Member
Hi

I have been interested in electronics for a while now and I have just gotten into microcontrollers. I have purchased a PICKit 1 a few months ago and I am having a lot of fun.

However there is a project in a magazine that I would like to build, and the microcontroller (PIC16F88) is not on the PIC Kit 1 compatible devices list.

Is it possible to make a small board with a IC socket on it that would plug into the evaluation socket then configure it so that all the programming pins (PGC, PGD, Vpp, Vss and Vdd) from the PIC Kit go into the respective pins on the PIC16F88. So basically a PCB thet would re-direct the programming pins from the PIC Kit into the correct pins on the new PIC.

Would this work? Or would the board just 'Release its Smoke'? :)

Also, there is another project utilizing a PIC18F2550, would this method work on it too?

Thanks,

Tom
 
Last edited:

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It's not a question of the pin connections (PIC's are fairly standard), it's a question of the programming algorithm required, with the PICKIT1 not supporting later devices. There are quite a lot of different programming algorithms used for different PIC's, and it's essential to use the correct one.
 

tom_pay

Member
OK then,

Do you know where I would find out what algorithms are used? Is it like 1, 2, 3 ect?

If I tried it and the algorithm was wrong, what is the worst thing that could happen? Smoke?

Thanks,

Tom
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Tom,


The Microchip site has information on that, you have to look up the "programming spec's" for the different part numbers.

I dont think you can use the Pickit 1 for any 18F chips though.
 

tom_pay

Member
Hi

Ive Had a look at some Datasheets for Programming these PIC's. They both mention 'Four words at a time' and one has two algorithms, depending on the Vdd voltage does this mean that they have the same algorithms?

Since they have four words at a time, does this make them have the same algorithm?

Is the algorithm the same for all PIC16F6's?

If the wrong algorithm is used, will it harm the chip, the programmer or my PC?

Tom
 
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Wp100

Well-Known Member
Hi,

Sounds like that Pk1 board has done its job and given you a good introduction to the Pics.

Although its still shown on Microchips site it really is a very old programmer and as you have found it is extremely limited in the chips its supports.

Trying modify the programmer software for newer chips is really an 'expert' thing and honestly think you will be wasting your time down that route.

The Pickit2 programmer is universally accepted as the best value / performance programmer for the hobbyist - its covers all but the top end latest chip.
There are also many plans on this forum for a diy version - search for 'Pickit2 Lite' - though the only problem is that it uses a 18f2550 chip that must first be programmed to make it work! - though I'm sure if you ask round or on this forum you will find someone local who would program up the chip for you.
 

tom_pay

Member
Hi

The PICKit 1 definatly has given me a great intro into PICs.

Just had a look and there is a PIC Kit 3, is this the newest one? I think that it's the cheapest at RS.

I would rather not build my own programmer because of experience reasons, so if I want to advance in the world of PIC's, would the PICKit 3 be alright?

Thanks

Tom
 

homemade24

New Member
I use the pickit 1 and I think the problem of using a pic16f88 is the pin location of vss and vdd compare the data sheet for pin out of say 16f690 0r 16f676 which it will program to the 16f88
just a thought
 

3v0

Coop Build Coordinator
Forum Supporter
Last time I looked the picKit3 was not quite ready for prime time. The picKit2 was a better choice and only $35. I expect in time we will need to move to the 3 for device support but not just yet for most of us.
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
I have the PICkit-2 clone as a kit for $25.00
It is one of the best programmers and has sockets for 8, 18 and 28 pin chips.
 

Wp100

Well-Known Member
Hi,

As 3V0 said, the older Pickit2 is still the number one programmer - the Pickit3 software is still very under developed plus somewhat pricey.

RS or Farnells both have the Pickit2 basic unit which you can use on its own, or probably hook up to your pk1 demo board ( cannot say for certain as I don't have that circuit )

For £10 more you might want to look at the Pickit2 Debugger - the same Pickit2 programmer but plus a little board with a smd pic on it and a few leds etc.
The thing about it is that you can run your program in the pic chip but have control of it from Mplab via the Pickit2.
You can do several things like stepping through the code in single steps or running certain sections of code then Breaking to see what has happened - all very good for debugging your code in its real enviroment.
The Rs site does not show the correct Debug Express image - Farnells link does
MICROCHIP|DV164121|DEBUG KIT, EXPRESS, PICKIT2 | Farnell United Kingdom

A very simple diy pickit2 lite is really quiet easy to build, either with a pcb or hand wired.
Heres one I did earlier... though it will still cost you about £10 - £12 in parts so a bought one might be your better option for now.

Either way am sure you will be more than pleased with it - don't forget it also includes extra tools that run on the pk2, like the Usart tool, Logic Analyser , Programmer -to - Go etc.
 

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I have both a 2 and a 3. The 2 is excellent - it auto-detects voltages and does everything it should. However, the 3 is much MUCH faster for debugging.
 

tom_pay

Member
Thank you to everyone who has replied.

Your help is greatly appreciated.

I will probably make my own PIC Kit 2, just buy the whole kit.

Thanks to every one for their time.

Tom
 
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