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pic 16c** and 16f** differences

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Ricardoco

New Member
Hi all
Ive been reading the data sheets for a 16f877 and a 16c65b both are 40 pin packages both with what appears to be the same pinouts i must have missed something because im not seeing the differences is there a big difference also what are the minimum programing pins for the above packages because my programmer supports 28 pin but dosnt support 40 pin packages so iam going to attempt to extrapolate any suggestions would be helpfull thankyou in advance :D Oh yes can anyone suggest the software that will support my velleman programmer because the software provided dosnt support them :(
 

FoxyRick

New Member
To start with, the 16F877 is flash programmable, the 16C65 is EPROM OTP (can't be reprogrammed)

Read the datasheets carefully - note that the 'C65 datasheet includes specs for other devices, for instance the 16C73 with its ADC's.

The '877 has AD convertors, more RAM, more Program memory, extra EEPROM memory... It is "upwards compatible" with the 'C65, but with added bits.

16C65B datasheet: http://www.electro-tech-online.com/custompdfs/2004/12/30605c.pdf

16F877 datasheet: http://www.electro-tech-online.com/custompdfs/2004/12/30292c.pdf

Cheers,
FoxyRick.
 

Ricardoco

New Member
ok so what in the part number signifies that this package is otp please excuse my ignorancce is that what the "c" in the part number is :D im assuming the "f" means flash and so flashable
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Ricardoco said:
ok so what in the part number signifies that this package is otp please excuse my ignorancce is that what the "c" in the part number is :D im assuming the "f" means flash and so flashable
The 'c' means it's OTP, don't ask me why! - but 'c' was the designation used on the original PIC's, all of which were OTP.

The first one to use EEPROM technology was the 16C84, they even used 'c' for that, but later changed it to the 16F84, after a later silicon revision.

The 'F' doesn't really mean 'FLASH', as only a smal number are actually FLASH, most are EEPROM - the 16F877 is EEPROM, but the new 16F877A is FLASH - but not all A suffix chips are FLASH, most are still EEPROM, the A just signifies a later silicon revision.

MicroChip copied Atmel in renaming their EEPROM chips FLASH, it's just an advertising ploy.
 

StupidDum

New Member
The 'flash' they mean is actually a ..hm.. flash-EEPROM.
It is EEPROM, but all memories could be erased at one time, something similiar with Flash.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
samcheetah said:
although some of the A chips are FLASH chips as Nigel has mentioned. but actually the A signifies the AUSART.
No! - the A simply signifies a later silicon revision, it's just coincidence that many of the recent ones include a USART in the later silicon. Comparators are quite a common addition as well, presumably they use a lot of common parts on the silicon wafer?.
 

david_mora

New Member
well, as one person said before i understand that 'c' correspond to OTP programming, that is, you an only program this PIC's one time.
on the other hand, we got 'f' PIC, this kind of PIC's support ICSP, what means in circuit serial programming, and you can "burn" them using a serial PC port.
If anybady disagree with what i'd wrote, i expect you to correct me, i'll be thankfull.

PD: i got a PIC 16C57C, but i do not know how to program it, any help is needed.
:D
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
david_mora said:
well, as one person said before i understand that 'c' correspond to OTP programming, that is, you an only program this PIC's one time.
on the other hand, we got 'f' PIC, this kind of PIC's support ICSP, what means in circuit serial programming, and you can "burn" them using a serial PC port.
If anybady disagree with what i'd wrote, i expect you to correct me, i'll be thankfull.
The "in circuit serial programming" is nothing to do with a PC serial port, and you can't simply connect one to it. It refers to the normal programming method, which is a bi-directional syncronous method.

PD: i got a PIC 16C57C, but i do not know how to program it, any help is needed.
:D
It's a parallel programmed chip, mostly only the MicroChip programmers support them - I've got over 200 16C57XT's in tubes, and can't do anything with them :lol:
 
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