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Need Advice on Buying a Multimeter

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raziiq

New Member
Hi there.

I am new to electronics world and within 2 weeks i came to know that i cant do anything in this Electronic World without a Multimeter.

So i need advice on buying a NOT VERY EXPENSIVE multimeter for my projects.

What should i keep in mind before buying a Multimeter?
 

raziiq

New Member
Thanks for the reply.

What should be a good range for calculating Voltage, Resistance and Current ??

For example

Max Voltage : ??? V
Max Resistance : ??? Ohms
Max Current: ??? Amp
 

raziiq

New Member
BTW what about this Multimeter

9245-multimeter.jpg


Specs:
- Diode Measurement
- Transistor Measurement
- DCV (200mV, 2000mV,20V,200V,500V)
- ACV (200V, 500V)
- DCA (200μA, 2000μA, 20mA,200mA,10A)
- Resistance (200Ω, 2000Ω 20kΩ,200kΩ,20MΩ)
 

raziiq

New Member
Ok good then.

Any other thing to keep in mind while buying Multimeter? Or is it enough with those specs?
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I bought an expensive Fluke multimeter. It was the best purchase I ever made. Then my boss bought a cheap Radio Shack multimeter. Mine has lasted 15 years and still looks like new and still works perfectly. My boss's multimeter failed in one week.
 

Birdman Adam

New Member
I would definitely agree with audioguru 100%. I bought a Fluke 115 multimeter (perfect for my uses), for about $100 and it has been my best multimeter ever! They sell so many different variations and if you are serious about electronics, then it would be a worthwhile investment to go for a Fluke.:D
9247-115main.jpg

Fluke 115 Multimeter
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Fluke make excellent DVMs, if you can afford one it will last a very long time.
I have a 5 1/2 digit bench DVM, bought second hand for 100Euro, very good for when I need good accuracy and resolution.

I also have a 3 1/2 digit handheld DVM of Korean origin, I cant remember how much it cost probably £30 (ish) over 20 years ago, still works OK.

I also have a very cheap DVM of indeterminate origin, but which has a family resemblance to the DMV the OP has shown us.
It cost me all of £3 as a special offer at Maplin a number of years ago.
This DVM lives in a toolbox in my garage for when I need to check something on the car. It is still working fine.

For a newby who is finding his way into electronics, the cheap DVM will be fine.

JimB
 

Mark_R

Member
Be Careful

Don't know the intended use of the meter, but if you plan to use it on mains voltage then a cheap meter can be a bad idea. Meters (professional ones at least) are rated category I-IV, its a measure of their ability to withstand a fault, the higher the better. My employees (electricians) are required to use at minimum CAT III meters. It can be the difference between no damage (or a dead meter) vs. a hand grenade.

Case in point; years ago I had a brain cramp, I was working on a clothes dryer with a rat shack analog meter. I accidentally measured 240VAC on OHM scale. Apparently there was no internal fuse. Before the front blew off the meter, the leads in my hand turned cherry red and gave me a nice temporary tattoo across my hands. :eek: it's been Fluke ever since.

Read up on it here ==> https://support.fluke.com/find_it.asp?Document=2173075
 
Last edited:

birdman0_o

Active Member
Don't know the intended use of the meter, but if you plan to use it on mains voltage then a cheap meter can be a bad idea. Meters (professional ones at least) are rated category I-IV, its a measure of their ability to withstand a fault, the higher the better. My employees (electricians) are required to use at minimum CAT III meters. It can be the difference between no damage (or a dead meter) vs. a hand grenade.

Case in point; years ago I had a brain cramp, I was working on a clothes dryer with a rat shack analog meter. I accidentally measured 240VAC on OHM scale. Apparently there was no internal fuse. Before the front blew off the meter, the leads in my hand turned cherry red and gave me a nice temporary tattoo across my hands. :eek: it's been Fluke ever since.

Read up on it here ==> Find_It



Smells like bacon
9304-Bacon_by_danniep.gif
 

Sceadwian

Banned
autoranging with a range override is always nice.
 

Dr. Evil.

New Member
Depends on what you really need.
Fluke had a great following but now there are countless stories about quality issues on the Internet now.

The guys I work with had flukes for years that never gave them problems. Now we have had 5 out of 6 developed glitches or just quit within months of their warranties ending. What we where quoted for repairs was more than most other good rated brands with the same or better features, specs, and warranties cost new. The company I work at wont buy us service technicians flukes again.

If your a rich kid who wants to show off in class you will buy a fluke. If you want something that does the same functions and more you may want to shop around.

You get what you pay for up to certain point and then your just buying a name.
My old fluke lasted me 15 years. My new one lasted 2 years and 3 months and was not even being used when it quit.
 
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