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Multiple light sources from one switch

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snboarer592

New Member
Thats great for the single push button but i was talking about the three momentary button setup, sorry for the ambiguity
 

carbonzit

Active Member
Thats great for the single push button but i was talking about the three momentary button setup, sorry for the ambiguity

Oh, right, you wanted "radio buttons". Forgot.

Oh, well, back to the laboratory ...

OK, this should give you exclusive buttons (each button turns on one light, turns off any others):

**broken link removed**

Looks complicated but pretty simple, really. Each pushbutton (debounced by a Schmitt trigger inverter) pulses the "set" of one FF and the "reset" of the other two FFs.

Diodes are any small-signal type (1N914/4148, etc.).

Not tested, but should work.
 
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mbarazeen

Member
see the attached circuit using 4017.
you can go up to 9 LEDs as you want.
when one is selected other will turn off.
this was in one of my post long before, you may need to modify some.
 

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carbonzit

Active Member
Hmm ... not sure that does what the O.P. wants it to do.

Forgive me if I misunderstand how your circuit works, but won't that simply turn on the next LED in sequence when any switch is closed? I see you have the switches all connected to CP1, so all they do is advance the counter by 1. You could just as well use just one switch, on CP1, to accomplish the same thing, no? Unless I'm missing something.

My circuit turns on a specific LED and turns all others off.
 

mbarazeen

Member
Hmm ... not sure that does what the O.P. wants it to do.

Forgive me if I misunderstand how your circuit works, but won't that simply turn on the next LED in sequence when any switch is closed? I see you have the switches all connected to CP1, so all they do is advance the counter by 1. You could just as well use just one switch, on CP1, to accomplish the same thing, no? Unless I'm missing something.

My circuit turns on a specific LED and turns all others off.

it works without any problem, actually the clock is from a clock generator with high frequency. when you press a particular switch, that will momentarily enable the counter (makes the "enable" in put to low) so that the counter starts to count very fast with clock until the out put at that particular switch becomes high, this will make the counter to be disabled and hold at that point. the action is very fast and it happens in a fraction of second depends on the clock input.

for clock two nand gate can be used with RC circuit.

i have already a design soldered with me and its working fine for a different application.

EDIT: the LEDs are to be connected via limiting resistors, not shown in the diagram.
 
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carbonzit

Active Member
Hmmm ... seems like kind of a bizarre way to skin this particular cat, but if it works, hey, that's good.

I still don't get how the switches both enable the clock and stop the clock, but if you say it works, I'll take your word for it.

Of course, you also need a 10kHz source, but I suppose a 555 would do this nicely.
 

mbarazeen

Member
Hmmm ... seems like kind of a bizarre way to skin this particular cat, but if it works, hey, that's good.

I still don't get how the switches both enable the clock and stop the clock, but if you say it works, I'll take your word for it.

Of course, you also need a 10kHz source, but I suppose a 555 would do this nicely.

sure you can go with 555, actually 4017 can sink some current, when you press a switch that is low, it connects to the enable input that is already high via 10k resistor. so this makes enable input goes low allowing the counter to run until it comes high via the pressed switch, it all hapens before you take your hand off from the button. you will not find any simulation program will give you a right out put, it works only when we do it in practice.
 
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