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Multimeter fuse voltages

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Elerion

Member
Hello.
I'm not sure about this. There're multimeter that use 600 or 1000V fuses for current measurements protection (200, 400 mA or whatever), and others that use 250V fuses. All multimeters being able to work with DC/AC voltages up to 600V.
What does this imply? Whats the difference between 250V and 600V fuses in this particular aapplication?
Thank you.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The voltage rating of a fuse means something, let;s drop lower for the time being. A 32 V fuse vs one for 250 V. So, it's possible that the 32 V fuse will arc inside and offer no protection on a 250 v circuit.

Same is true for 600 and 250 V fuses.
 

kubeek

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
But there should be no or very little voltage drop when measuring current.
This confuses me.
Unless you do a bozo move and start measuring voltage when your meter is set to current. Then the proper HRC fuse is the only thing protecting you from an exploding meter, especially with high current capable lines like busbars.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Your meter does drop some voltage when its measuring current, it needs too so it can actually measure current, however the fuse itself should only drop a tiny voltage.
The voltage rating as mentioned means if the fuse 'blows' the circuit will be reliably disconnected up to the voltage rating of the fuse, if you over voltage the fuse you might not notice anything until the fuse fails, then the would be a risk that the fuse would either not fail at all or arc over internally, neither of which would protect you or the circuit.
For a meter its critically important for your own safety to use the correct fuse, you hold the probes & leads and maybe the meter itself while your connected to power, it wouldnt be nice for the leads & meter to vaporize while your holding them, meter fuses are expensive but necessary.
 
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