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Micro USB B standard SM footprint.

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Pommie

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Looking on Farnell (element14 here in Aus) for a surface mount Micro USB socket reveals many different ones all with a different footprint. Is ther such a thing as a standard footprint? I found a this Molex one which looks kinda standard but it is being phased out. Surely people aren't continually changing board layouts because a footprint went out of date!

Mike.
 

Pommie

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After further investigation, I think I'm going to use the footprint I found at Sparkfun as it matches the Molex socket above and seems to be close to a standard.

I've been advised to add 4 vias to the mounting pads to reduce the risk of it being ripped off. Has anyone tried this, have an oppinion on this idea?

Mike.
 

Superdat

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Hi
It's he who talks rubbish ;-)
I've never tried this approach, the copper layer is under greatest stress when it is levered up or down. IMO you would have to be a bit brutal to pull the copper away. I've only ever pulled copper off when trying to desolder and being a bit rough because I couldn't get it to move. Even then it was a single hole not multiple as with this device and it was at the end of a 1.25mm track. I know the signal/supply pins don't add much strength, but it all helps to stop the socket moving.
Depending how it fits and how far the socket protrudes, the housing around the socket can give some support mainly by reducing the ability to move the plug up/down/left/right, etc.
I guess you could fit a U shaped piece of wire over the tab using a via either side. i.e. 4 vias in total.
Then solder both sides, this would definitely make it stronger, resisting up and down, side to side and backwards/forwards pressure when inserting/removing the plug.
Looking at the shape of the socket, it might be a bit of a fiddle! The lugs don't look very big and they are recessed under the socket's body. I can't tell from the data sheet, but it looks like the surface that the lugs protrude from might be solderable too. In which case you would have a relatively large surface area soldered on either side or even all the way across.
If not a generous helping of solder on the lugs would expand the surface are of copper used.

What would I do? Use it as it is, using as much solder as reasonably possible to reinforce the lugs.
 

Pommie

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Hi Superdat, was busy over this week so only just saw your reply. I've now drawn the footprint and it is very small. There are the 5 connections and 4 additional support tabs. Although these look big in comparison to the connections, they are just 1.9mm square. I decided to replace these four pads with 4 square vias that are 1.9mm on each side. The hope is that the plating through will add strength. Time will tell.

Mike.
 

Pommie

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Hi DirtyLude, any thoughts on using square vias to strengthen the mounting or is it a waste of time.

Mike.
 

DirtyLude

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Seems like an idea to prevent ripping off the copper. Never done it, but I would give it a try.
 

Pommie

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I finally got around to soldering this little beauty. Talk about tricky. I managed by placing the tiniest amount of paste on the 5V pin, melting it and then placing the socket onto that one pin. I then soldered the mechanical lugs to affix it securely then finally the ground pin. Luckily, I'm only using it for charging so didn't need the middle 3 pins. Hopefully, practice will make this easier. Any tips, I'm all ears.

Mike.
 

Superdat

Member
That's more or less what I do with a slight variation. I only do big SMDs 1206 or similar sized VRs.
I solder one pin on the PCB then use the solder sucker to remove the solder leaving a "tinned" pin. Then position the SMD/Socket, press down gently with plastic tweezers and solder it.
Then wick solder the rest. If I don't remove the solder first, I can never get the component level, it's always high on that pin.
 

JonSea

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For a couple boards I've laid out recently, I've used an SMT socket that mounts in a cutout in the board. I think tbis adds strength in most cases, but more importantly, the slot forces the connector into position, making soldering slightly easier.

I purchased the connectors on ebay. I found a Hirose footprint that worked well for these. I can locate it of you'd like.

20170703_075817.jpg
 
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