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Measure hardness, any ideas?

SimonTHK

Member
Hello smart people

So I want to measure hardness of different kind of balls Ive got.
Does anyone have any Idea on how I can do this?

I want my "machine" to measure this by itself, using a microprocessor to measure som voltage or similar that indicate the hardness of the (the difference are not big, so it needs high accuracy). Do I need to be extremely innovative, or is this made before or easy for me in any way?

Thanks in advance
Best regards Simon
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
A little googling produces plenty of information - your 'problem' is finding, or making, some kind of sensor to provide a signal.

I presume you are aware it's pretty well a distructive' test?, you're measuring how much damage it takes.

 

Buk

Active Member
Does anyone have any Idea on how I can do this?
The only entirely non-destructive method of testing hardness -- assuming the balls are not brittle -- is a rebound test:

Have you seen this video

Ignore the "LiquidMetal", its just a brand name. The metal on the left is an amorphous (non-crystalline) metal, similar (if not the same) as MetGlas Amorphous Iron.

Its okay for comparative testing, but its not easy to calibrate.

Dunno how you would make a machine to do it. Maybe drop a ball in a glass tube onto a titanium plate and use lasers and diodes to time the speed of the rebound.
 

SimonTHK

Member
What kind of balls? Ball bearings, tennis balls, bowling balls etc. Mike.
Hello Mike

It is just a miniature golf ball. It is quite soft compared to metals.
I have no idea og how to do it :)

Maybe something about measuring the height of a bounch, maybe numbers of bounces I dunno.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Sure it is NOT a solution for your query but could spark an idea: when testing fruits to see if still suitable for export they use a quite simple instrument with kind of a small piston striking the surface from a certain distance.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Are these real golf balls? As most have full information available.

Mike.
 

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