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Making a laptop battery into a battery pack

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Orel Fichman

New Member
Hi,
I recently took aart an old laptop and I want to make the LCD a standalone computer with a raspberry pi screwed on the back ofcthe monitor (sort of like an all-in-one).
I took the battery apart and would like to use it to power both the rpi and the screen, it seems to be a li-po made out of 4 cells and it seems to be connected both in paralell and in series (see picture) and connected to a board which I assume is a voltage regulator.
How can I make it into a battery pack supplying 5 volts to the rpi while supplying 12 volts to the lcd screen control board?
Thanks in advance.
P.s. this is my first project, I know this is sort of over my head, but I'm looking for the guidance as to not hurt myself in the process of building this projectIMG_20170707_145239.jpg This is the battery pack found inside
IMG_20170707_143205.jpg This is the battery pack before being disassembled
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
You don't require to disassemble the pack to do what you require to do..

Take the 7.4 volts and build a step-down for the 5 volt supply, and a step-up for the 12 volt.
You can use with the "Simple Switcher" series from TI (formerly National Semi).

They offer full designs and many magnetic component vendors offer inductors fully characterized to be used with them.

Close it down, these batteries pack a lot of energy and can actually burst and flame if shorted.
 

Orel Fichman

New Member
You don't require to disassemble the pack to do what you require to do..

Take the 7.4 volts and build a step-down for the 5 volt supply, and a step-up for the 12 volt.
You can use with the "Simple Switcher" series from TI (formerly National Semi).

They offer full designs and many magnetic component vendors offer inductors fully characterized to be used with them.

Close it down, these batteries pack a lot of energy and can actually burst and flame if shorted.
What held it together was just sticky tape, should I use electric tape to seal it or is there something more effective?

EDIT: I also need to charge these somehow, any ideas?
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Depending how much current you need you could just pull apart a Usb 5v power bank and connect it up to the batteries, charging might be slow.
Be extremely carefull with lipo's if you short them, bang, and if you put 2 in parallel and one is charged and one flat you can end up in the same situation as a short.
 
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