Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

looking for resistor for my treadmill.

rushin4

New Member
My treadmill stopped working (initiating the motor start/belt roll). Found ceramic resistor in the capacitor charging circuit cracked. Resistor is labelled:
PW7P
82ohm symbol , then a "J". e.g. 82ohmJ
V5-201

Rectangular in shape, about 1.3" long, about 0.4" deep & wide.
Can anybody point me to one?

Tracy
 

ramondo

Member
Bad resistors are generally not the only cause for failure. They usually go bad when too much current is sent through them. Brand, Model of treadmill and photos of circuit board will help will help. Try looking for a schematic (electrical diagram of functions) online for your unit.
 

rushin4

New Member
thanks guys. No schematic. I found the parts at Newark Electronics. Had to order 10 of the resistors, so I'll solder one in and see if that fixes it, or leads to something else. I might be back.
 

rushin4

New Member
Pacemaster Digital P.S. #501009 Rev. D.
Standoffs: board is mounted sideways in front of the motor.
Pic attached.
Note: treadmill was plugged into GFCI circuit, could this have caused anything?
IMG_20220124_110249248.jpg
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is the resistor actually open circuit?
I should have been a little more clear, I meant a resistor on stand-offs, some are like this due to high heat radiation.
Unfortunately not a board I am familiar with.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As already asked, is the resistor open circuit? The damage looks to be mechanical rather than caused by overheating.
For comparison, here's a 10W wire wound resistor next to a rule for comparison.
resistor.png

Note, it also has the J.

Mike.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
BTW, if it is OK electrically and just cracked open, you can repair it very easily with Muffler Cement if you so wish.
Sets up hard when the resistor heats up.
Available at any Auto parts supplier in a small tube.
 

rushin4

New Member
tested both resisters. about 75-86 ohms. I guess they function OK. Maybe related to long-term exposure to a GFCI outlet (instructions specifically warn against this).

With only a multimeter, is there to test the 2200uf capacitor?
gives error code 13, related to capacitor circuit per internet research

Pacemaster Silver.
 

rushin4

New Member
reinstalled board after repairing resistor with muffler epoxy. Ran heavy extension to regular outlet upstairs. Plugged in and started. Standby startup was normal. Pushed start, motor/belt just barely moved before stopping movement. Now error 306; soft start circuit failed to charge the capacitor at start-up. Wish I could find a schematic.

board part number: DBBWRA, marked "P.S. #501009 Rev. D

treadmill model; Pacemaster Silver Select XP (obsolete, out of business).

couldn't find replacement circuit board on ebay. Any thoughts?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
reinstalled board after repairing resistor with muffler epoxy. Ran heavy extension to regular outlet upstairs. Plugged in and started. Standby startup was normal. Pushed start, motor/belt just barely moved before stopping movement. Now error 306; soft start circuit failed to charge the capacitor at start-up. Wish I could find a schematic.

board part number: DBBWRA, marked "P.S. #501009 Rev. D

treadmill model; Pacemaster Silver Select XP (obsolete, out of business).

couldn't find replacement circuit board on ebay. Any thoughts?
Get yourself a pencil, and a number of sheets of paper - and draw the circuit out. You need a number of sheets because you have to do a goodly number of versions to get to your final one, with the very early versions often only been partial schematics.

It's not easy, it takes a long time, but it's a very valuable skill to have - and you could then post the details on-line for others.
 

Mactheknife

New Member
Wow, that resistor must have heated up very quickly to split like that.

Hope this info helps rushin4 or others.

I had a similar problem with my relative Pacemaster Gold Elite.
He plugged it into the GFI outlet as well.
I did not notice any burnt or cracked resistors, broken fuses, or burnt PCB traces at the time.

Could not find the schematic on the net either.
What I did do, was replace the black power MOSFET (think it was IRF264 (250v,38 amp),
as that would control the treadmill motor.
I unsoldered it and carefully removed the isolation silicon pad (for use on new MOSFET),
If the pad is damaged in any way, buy a new one. I installed the new MOSFET.
Put all back together and it worked.

About that 2200uf capacitor.
It will dry out eventually and show "error" and beeping without showing any error code.
I had to replace that on the same treadmill a year later.
What will happen is the cap won't filter the dc voltage enough.
When the motor is running at 4 mph or higher and pushing the "Pause" or "Cool Down" button,
the circuitry detects something is wrong and shuts the motor down immediately,
(probably because there's so much ac ripple going to the motor at that time).
The bad capacitor is somewhat difficult to remove as it's glued to the PCB.
 

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
About that 2200uf capacitor.
It will dry out eventually and show "error" and beeping without showing any error code.
I had to replace that on the same treadmill a year later.
What will happen is the cap won't filter the dc voltage enough.
When the motor is running at 4 mph or higher and pushing the "Pause" or "Cool Down" button,
the circuitry detects something is wrong and shuts the motor down immediately,
(probably because there's so much ac ripple going to the motor at that time).
The bad capacitor is somewhat difficult to remove as it's glued to the PCB.
You could almost certainly just add and additional capacitor in parallel with the bad one. It could be mounted off the circuit board with wires to connect it to the same points on the circuit board.
 

Mactheknife

New Member
Yes, that could work.
I've read that really old electrolytics can sometimes short circuit inside the cap,
but Pacemasters are not that old, so paralleling the caps is a good option.
There's enough space on the metal bottom floor to drill holes for mounting a perf board\cap,
or just using thick cable ties in bigger drilled holes to hold the new cap in place.

An even simpler way could be placing the new cap touching the side of the bad cap.
Cable tie the two caps together loosely. Solder the wires.
Before screwing the power control board back in place, reposition the new cap so there are no obstructions.
Now tighten the cable ties and add super glue to the ties and capacitors to stop the ties from sliding off with the treadmill vibrations.

Cap aad-on.png



If they used soft rtv silicone adhesive under the original cap like a company I worked for did,
it's a lot easier to remove the cap than with the hard epoxy\superglue that Pacemaster used.
Just in case Pacemaster did sometimes use soft silicone under the original cap,
suck or wick as much solder as possible from the caps leads to get them loose(PC-board is double sided copper),
then use a flat chisel type x-acto blade or box cutter blade to cut through the silicone seal, and replace it with a good cap.
 

New Articles From Microcontroller Tips

Top