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Linear actuator driven by a fast solid state relay

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ericgibbs

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Friends,

I am planning to drive the following linear actuator:

http://www.firgelli.com/pdf/PQ12_datasheet.pdf

with a fast solid-state relay or TTL pulse level.

The purpose is to get a slow but precise linear translation.

Is it possible or do you envision any problem.

Thank you kindly

Calculus
hi,:)
With a SSR are you able to reverse connect the actuator coil in order to drive in and out and then maintain its position.?
 

Calculus

New Member
Well I need it to move forward slowly, I will use another -5V supply to reverse it.

However, I need very precise forward movement, what do you think?

Thanks
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Well I need it to move forward slowly, I will use another -5V supply to reverse it.

However, I need very precise forward movement, what do you think?

Thanks
hi,
If you used a simple H Bridge you drive the actuator in both directions precisely, no need for a -5V supply.

H Bridge Circuits

The LM293 is a H Bridge.
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Use a single 5V supply, 2 Nchannel and 2 Pchannel Mosfets in a H-Bridge circuit with two logic inputs. The direction of travel will be determined by which input you pulse. The width and period of the pulse could determine the average speed of travel. If you want to control position using the feedback resistor built-in to the actuator, that is bit more complicated, but that could be done too. What determines where you want the actuator at a given time?
 

Calculus

New Member
Use a single 5V supply, 2 Nchannel and 2 Pchannel Mosfets in a H-Bridge circuit with two logic inputs. The direction of travel will be determined by which input you pulse. The width and period of the pulse could determine the average speed of travel. If you want to control position using the feedback resistor built-in to the actuator, that is bit more complicated, but that could be done too. What determines where you want the actuator at a given time?

I was planning to use the pulse width and number of pulses to determine the increment of translation for a particular period of time.

The extent of translation is more important in my project and not the absolute position.

Another thing I am a bit confused about: In the specs for the actuator what do the mean by a duty cycle of 20%?

Thanks a lot:)
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I was planning to use the pulse width and number of pulses to determine the increment of translation for a particular period of time.

The extent of translation is more important in my project and not the absolute position.

Another thing I am a bit confused about: In the specs for the actuator what do the mean by a duty cycle of 20%?

Thanks a lot:)
hi,
The way I read te spec for the actuator is, that it must not be powered for more than 20% of the time.

Its only got a rated lifetime of 200hrs!! under ideal conditions..,seems quite a short time in my experience.
 
Last edited:

Calculus

New Member
hi,
The way I read te spec for the actuator is, that it must not be powered for more than 20% of the time.

Its only got a rated lifetime of 200hrs!! under ideal conditions..,seems quite a short time in my experience.
Dear ericgibbs,

Yes you are right about the 200 hrs. However, seems like the cheapest I can get in the market.

So if I get it right about the duty cycle:

The interpulse interval should be at least 5 times each pulse width?

Thanks

Calculus:)
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Dear ericgibbs,

Yes you are right about the 200 hrs. However, seems like the cheapest I can get in the market.

So if I get it right about the duty cycle:

The interpulse interval should be at least 5 times each pulse width?

Thanks

Calculus:)
hi,
It would be 1 to 4
 
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