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LED wiring help

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izaktaylor

New Member
hey all

i recently purchased an LED kit that im putting in my aquarium that comes with :

10W 8:1 Red Blue LED
Driver
Heatsink

i am completely unsure on to wire the LED and run it either through mains power, or batteries, i have included some pictures:
**broken link removed**
**broken link removed**
**broken link removed**
**broken link removed**
 

izaktaylor

New Member
Screen Shot 2013-12-27 at 4.11.05 PM.png
Screen Shot 2013-12-27 at 4.11.14 PM.png
 

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audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
During your reply you click the box called "Upload a File" then put the picture's File Name in the box and click Open. Then the picture will be attached to your reply here. If you click More Options during a reply then you can add more pictures to a reply.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You have an LED driver with a regulated 300mA output and its polarity is shown.
You have an LED module without polarity shown, no part number, no manufacturer's name and no spec's.
 

izaktaylor

New Member
You are speaking in a unfamiliar languge haha, does this help? negative=left positive=right
 

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KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Kit assumed to go together.

You should notice that there is an L and N terminal on the LED Power supply. That connects to Line and Neutral. NZ's power is like 230 V 50 Hz, and the supply has a wide range 90-265 50/60 Hz. Those wires connect to the wall. L is usually the Hot wire and N is usually the one that is nearest the ground potential, For a two wire system, it doesn't usually matter except L would normally be switched. The 2 prong, type I plug would work. https://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity.htm#plugs_I Not sure if NZ has a split phase system. Split phase needs both power leads to be broken/contact made with the switch.

You should smear a little heat sink grease or thermal grease between the LED and the heatsink.

The LED power supply (PS) has a + and - on it and so does the LED. + of the PS to + of the LED and - of the PS to - of the LED.
 

izaktaylor

New Member
ok thanks keepitsimplestupid! if you could tell me how to set it up as basic as possible i would be very greatful
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Identify the + of the power supply
Identify the - of the power supply
Identify the - side of the LED
Identify the + side of the LED.

Your missing ring terminals and an appropriate screw, washer and lockwasher. Something like this: https://www.dicksmith.co.nz/tools-hobbyist/assorted-crimp-connectors-dsnz-h5070 The ring should be the size of the hole and the crimp part should fit the wire.

This requires a tool such as this one:
https://www.surplustronics.co.nz/products/4484-stripper-cutter-crimp-tool

Soldering looks like an option too.

Here is a suggestion for the heat sink grease: https://www.dicksmith.co.nz/tools-hobbyist/economy-heat-transfer-compound-dsnz-n1205 You place a light film between the LED and the heat sink before attaching.

Your going to have to find a case and a cord and this is just one possible cord: https://www.surplustronics.co.nz/products/3983-iec-power-lead-3-pin-plug-to-iec-plug-right-angle

Something like this: **broken link removed** is a mating connector. If you used something like this **broken link removed** you would not have to solder.

An alternative method is to get a box and a cable gland and pass the insulated wire through the box. Use wirenuts inside the box for the power.

Then you have to pass the LED wires out through a grommet and tie an Underwriters knot on the inside. https://www.animatedknots.com/under....jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.comUnderwriter

A lot goes into putting something together. And you probably will have to strain relief the LED wires too.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Arranging some insurance for the fishes inside as well?:D
 

4pyros

Well-Known Member
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i recently purchased an LED kit that im putting in my aquarium that comes with :
Why would a kit come without instructions?
Have you checked online at the vendors site for the instructions?
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A lot of China stuff is just that, Nothing. Your expected to find whatever instructions/specs on the web.

Nowadays, you don't even get packing lists.

==

Most of what the OP needs is really mechanical or electro/mechanical. So, there is putting the power supply in a box of some sort with two cables coming out of it. Some consideration MIGHT be placed on water resistance. No real need for a ground if the power supply is placed in a plastic box.

There are any number of options:

The simplest, I think is a cable gland for the power cable and a grommet for the LED output. Zip cord/speaker wire might be a good choice for the wire.

I think there was an installed connector pigtail for the lamp. Connection of a pigtail would normally involve solder splicing and covering with heat shrink tubing. A crimp style butt connector could be used and covered with heat shrink tubing. This stuff shrinks about 50% when heated. Crimping does require a tool.

The LED has to be mounted with heat shrink grease and also mechanically mounted and the heatsink has to be attached above the tank somehow. The wires from this assembly may need some sort of strain relief and/or disconnect. By strain relief, I mean something that will not allow the wires to tug on the LED itself. This might be as simple as some cable clamps and tywraps. Digikey is a place to get small quantities and not packages of 100. Tywraps should probably be black.

It does look like the LED connections can be soldered, but I think ring terminals and stainless hardware might be a good way.

So, it looks like you can do it without soldering which is an art in itself, but not without crimping. The choice of connectors are dependent on wire size.

For someone, like me, who had full machine shop access and also electronics this is just second nature.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you have a diffuser for the tiny dot of extremely bright light to spread it out? Otherwize the fish and people will be blinded.
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ping pong ball works good, but your led would probably melt it! Dads tank has led lights, but he used 1W leds and ping pong balls, they are housed in a home built hood so you cant see the balls, they are housed under patterned acrylic sheet
 
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