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ld Eelectrohome DVD player MODEL EH8181A That stopped powering on!

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Mr-Robby

New Member
Hi Folks,

I have a very old Eelectrohome DVD player MODEL EH8181A That stopped powering on today.

Thought I would post the Power Supply board to see if anyone knows what the most likely issue would be here.

I thought of things like:

1) Fuse - not sure how to identify where the fuse is here and how it could be replaced once located?
2) I see something that looks like burn on top of one of the what looks like a capacitor, could just be rust, if that blew, any way to replace it?
3) anything else to look at?

I can't seem to find my volt meter but I wouldn't know what to check even if I could.

Thanks! Rob

 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is the cap bulging? It's hard to tell from the angle of the light in the photo but it looks different from the other caps which are for sure not bulging. If so, replace it.
 

Mr-Robby

New Member
Is the cap bulging? It's hard to tell from the angle of the light in the photo but it looks different from the other caps which are for sure not bulging. If so, replace it.
You mean the thing that looks like a capacitor and has discoloration on top? If so, yeah, I think it is bulging. Does that mean it blew up? How do I get a new one and how would I replace it? thanks!
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You mean the thing that looks like a capacitor and has discoloration on top? If so, yeah, I think it is bulging. Does that mean it blew up? How do I get a new one and how would I replace it? thanks!
Just compare it with all the other caps next to it. There is normally a slight indentation or it's flat the most. If it's anything else it;s bulging. It hasn't blown up yet...but it's definitely not doing what it should be doing.

Get a soldering iron and heat up the cap's pins on the underside and it pull it out. Heat one pin at a time and tilt it out, or heat both at the same time if your tip is wide enough. You can refer to some youtube videos.

The capacitance and voltage rating should be written on the cap. Find another one of the same diameter and pin spacing with at least the same voltage and approximately the same capacitance. You can go to a local electronics shop if you have one and ask or order online. Mouser or Digikey are the main places I order form.

It's called an leaded electrolytic capacitor. If ordering online make sure to check datasheets for physical dimensions.
 
Last edited:

Mr-Robby

New Member
Ok, thanks. Will give it a try. I am new at playing aorund with these things, usually I just throw them in the trash and buy a new one but wanted to see if I could actual fix one for fun.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ok, thanks. Will give it a try. I am new at playing aorund with these things, usually I just throw them in the trash and buy a new one but wanted to see if I could actual fix one for fun.
If it's really for fun, you could try powering it up after the cap is removed but before replacing it with a new one. It may run (depends how critical that capacitance was. It may have been working in tandem with the one right next to it and if the value wasn't critical it will still run, albight with degraded performance.
 

Ylli

Active Member
Electrolytic caps are polarized. Note any polarity markings on the old cap and be sure to install the new one with the same polarity.
 

Western

Member
Two more points ...

1) Most switched mode power supplies use capacitors with 105 degree rating ... not just the standard of 85 degrees ... so add that to the requirement for a replacement.

2) Again, with switched mode power supplies ... often when they will not operate ... the mains capacitor (large cylindrical cap - top rh corner of your photo) will often remain charged.

If you find your multimeter, measure for any voltage across it before you go too far ... it will help us in diagnosing more if replacing the damaged one doesn't solve your problem.

If it is still charged, it will pay to discharge it before you do to much else ... either using a resistor of say 5 watts and a resistance of a few hundred ohms ... or if you like sparks and loud noises ... just short it out with a screwdriver.

If you don't mind surprises and want reminding of the curse words you know ... just leave it charged. :D
 

Mr-Robby

New Member
Ok so I measured the little bugger best I could:

Part: Leaded Electrolytic capacitor
Diameter: 8mm
uF: 1000 uF
Temperature: 105 celcius
Height: 20mm
Pin Distance: 5mm
Voltage: 16V
Brand: <BH>
Polarity: TBD

So how would I ensure I get the right part and size?

Mouser or Digikey looks cool but I get lost on the first menu for filtering.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ok so I measured the little bugger best I could:

Part: Leaded Electrolytic capacitor
Diameter: 8mm
uF: 1000 uF
Temperature: 105 celcius
Height: 20mm
Pin Distance: 5mm
Voltage: 16V
Brand: <BH>
Polarity: TBD

So how would I ensure I get the right part and size?

Mouser or Digikey looks cool but I get lost on the first menu for filtering.
Ok so I measured the little bugger best I could:

Part: Leaded Electrolytic capacitor
Diameter: 8mm
uF: 1000 uF
Temperature: 105 celcius
Height: 20mm
Pin Distance: 5mm
Voltage: 16V
Brand: <BH>
Polarity: TBD

So how would I ensure I get the right part and size?

Mouser or Digikey looks cool but I get lost on the first menu for filtering.
Does this help?
https://www.digikey.ca/products/en/capacitors/aluminum-electrolytic-capacitors/58?k=capacitor&k=&pkeyword=capacitor&pv508=4&FV=mu1000µF|2049,mu100V|2079,mu125V|2079,mu150V|2079,mu160V|2079,mu165V|2079,mu16V|2079,mu175V|2079,mu180V|2079,mu200V|2079,mu20V|2079,mu210V|2079,mu220V|2079,mu225V|2079,mu230V|2079,mu250V|2079,mu25V|2079,mu280V|2079,mu28V|2079,mu300V|2079,mu30V|2079,mu315V|2079,mu330V|2079,mu350V|2079,mu35V|2079,mu360V|2079,mu385V|2079,mu400V|2079,mu40V|2079,mu415V|2079,mu420V|2079,mu42V|2079,mu450V|2079,mu45V|2079,mu475V|2079,mu500V|2079,mu50V|2079,mu525V|2079,mu550V|2079,mu55V|2079,mu56V|2079,mu575V|2079,mu580V|2079,mu600V|2079,mu60V|2079,mu630V|2079,mu63V|2079,mu650V|2079,mu70V|2079,mu71V|2079,mu75V|2079,mu80V|2079,ffe0003a,1c0002,1c0006,402e23,1140050,1f140000&quantity=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&pageSize=100

BTW, Mouse prices are cheaper but the Digikey search is superior.

You need not enter all search criteria in at the same time. Enter the most important things and filter. It will remove narrow down and remove search criteria that aren't available for products based on the previous search criteria you already used.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I took a stab at it, does this look right?

View attachment 113087
The third one seems to have the proper lead spacing. The first one does not and the second its not listed for the second one in the search database (which means you have to check the datasheet but capacitor datasheets are overwhelming if you're starting out since a single datasheet covers multiple sizes and models, all with slight differences and only discernible by a vague code. The simpler the component, the more complicated the datasheet is the way it usually goes.).

If you use the search enough you learn not to always trust the search since sometimes information is entered in or are classified incorrectly, or not classified so they dissapear when filters are applied when they should appear...but let's not worry about that for now.
 

Mr-Robby

New Member
The third one seems to have the proper lead spacing. The first one does not and the second its not listed for the second one in the search database (which means you have to check the datasheet but capacitor datasheets are overwhelming if you're starting out since they cover every model available in that line)
yeah, i forgot to look at spacing column. So looks like #3 wins.

upload_2018-5-22_14-33-3.png
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Looks good to me. Might want to throw some extra stuff like a few tools into the order because $1 capacitor for $8 worth of shipping through the mail seems like a waste.

Maybe solder, an iron, and hemostats if you don't already have them.
 

Mr-Robby

New Member
Looks good to me. Might want to throw some extra stuff like a few tools into the order because $1 capacitor for $8 worth of shipping through the mail seems like a waste.

Maybe solder, an iron, and hemostats if you don't already have them.
I plan to take these specs across to the Chinese mall here. There's a guy there with a bunch of old electronics and he may be able to easily source this part. will see. thanks everyone!
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I plan to take these specs across to the Chinese mall here. There's a guy there with a bunch of old electronics and he may be able to easily source this part. will see. thanks everyone!
That works too. It's not a very special part.
 
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