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Lamp step control

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AnalogKid

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I have an idea, and the question is Does someone already make a product to do this?

Garage ceiling light is bright enough for most things, but sometimes I'd like a lot more. I don't want to run a new line to a second wall switch, or have a pull string. And, I've got a basement full of parts.

The idea is to have a controller sitting on the switched AC to the existing light. If it sees an AC dropout of less than 1 second, it enables a TRIAC or SSR to power a second light downstream.

Turn on switch - original light
Quickly turn switch off and on again - both lights
Turn switch off and on slowly - original light

Off is off - the original light goes off when flicking the switch to enable the second light. The controller has enough energy storage to keep its logic alive for one second. If power is off longer than that, it comes up reset (second light is off).

Add a 4017 and some jumpers, and the same technique could run up to 9 lights in a string.

The 4017 part probably is too complex for a commercial product, but I would think a single stage controller would be pretty handy, particularly in spaces like a garage or basement. I've got the circuit worked out; my question is if something already does this?

Thanks.

ak
Lamp-Step-Control-1-c.gif
 

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ci139

Active Member
the quick web search did not matched your idea however it pointed out the requirement for ever more capable switch to coupe with increasing no. of lights
... other than that i recently debugged a movement triggered garage door light - attempting to spot a cool trick to power the control circuitry (in "series") - as it turned out they use reactive impedance to limit grid/line-input - very uncool
post-54570-1227167417x.gif
 

AnalogKid

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they use reactive impedance to limit grid/line-input - very uncool
Disagree. Safe, reliable, cost effective, proven over decades in millions of products. The power level is only 1 VA, so I think the world power grid is safe.

ak
 

ClydeCrashKop

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If it sees an AC dropout of less than 1 second, it enables a TRIAC or SSR to power a second light downstream.
I am thinking this is all they have to do. When cascaded, each one just turns on the next one. Flick the switch 9 times, 9 lights come on.
 

ClydeCrashKop

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Light #9 would see 8 TRIACs in series.
If that would be a problem, you could add a relay in each unit like the auxiliary output on a motion sensor porch light.
You would have to make them accept multiple on/off cycles.
 

ClydeCrashKop

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Light #9 would see 8 TRIACs in series.
Maybe not. If all of the lights have their own power supply and your circuit/triac just turns them on and sends a signal to the next one.
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Too complicated. The circuit is one quad NAND gate and two MOSFETs. The circuit is powered downstream of the light switch and does not have constant power when the lights are off. Also, a relay coil is too much power to pull through an X capacitor.

ak
 

ci139

Active Member
The power level is only 1 VA
i had couple of about 2W(output):5W(input) transformers that climbed above +70°C at prolonged medium load operation - then i attached 78cm²(12in²) heat sinks and they stayed below +40°C // T a bit above +70°C -- is relatively low for a steel transformer but might cook the rest of the circuitry or significantly reduce it's lifespan ?
Disagree. Safe, reliable
agree
cost effective
 
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