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kwhr versus deg celsius

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sanpedromp

New Member
Hello,
New to this site and forum, but can anyone help me please.

How much energy (in kwhr) will I need to change 1 deg celsius (up or down) from any refererence temperature and any reference room size.

Thanks.
 

Hero999

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sanpedromp

New Member
Meaning what? I still can't relate this to my question. Thanks anyway. Is there anybody who can help me there. Thanks again.
 

Torben

Well-Known Member
I think what he was saying is that you have not given enough information to answer the question.


Torben
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
A KWh is a measurement of energy. Temperature change is a measurement of the thermal energy in a substance.
Every substance has a specific heat value relative to water. It either takes more energy or less energy per unit of mass for the same level of temperature change as what would be needed to make that change in water.
If a substance had a specific heat value of .2 that means that one mass unit of it takes 20% of the energy it would take to make that same temperature change in an equal mass of water which has a specific heat value of 1.

Without knowing the volumes, masses, and materials that make up the volumes and masses it impossible to relate a temperature change to any amount of energy needed to make that change.
Dry air will take far less energy to raise it one degree than that of humid air. Concrete takes far more than moist air.

See the concept now? Thats why we need more information.;)
 

sanpedromp

New Member
Ah ok, it's like this: say: the room size is w=6m, l=5m, h=2.5m initial room temperature 24deg celsius, wall concrete plaster, outside temp 31deg celsius; question= how much kwhr will I need to reduce or increase the room temperature by 1 deg celsius.

thanks torben & hero999
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I played around with the numbers on several home heating webs site and they seem to vary widely. Assuming average numbers and nothing specific in regards to thermal losses or air humidity levels the numbers I found seem to be between 135 and 380 Watts per degree C change.
They dont show the formulas but just go by the room dimensions and insulation ratings. If you include the total mass of the walls, floor and ceiling I suspect the wattage number would be much higher yet.

Your question is too generalized to get any better than just rough numbers at this point. In realistic terms there are many other factors that will dictate the true amount of energy needed and would likely make that estimated value range even wider depending upon those other factors.
 

sanpedromp

New Member
To everyone thanks, you to what i am trying to do.are all a good help
I need to find that "several home heating webs site" to make my assumptions a "near reality". Thanks again.
 
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