Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Kirchoff Voltage Law (KVL)

Status
Not open for further replies.

mpaap

New Member
Helloo again, im here again with my homework!

This time i need to do THIS

How do i solve these circuits or what ever they are..
Please help me, i need kind a step by step instruction.

What i have been doing is..
Let's take first one..
Well i look this Voltagemeter and then i start going by the line from + to -
first obstacle on the way is V2 (in my eyes) and V2 is -2 and the second obstacle is V1 and thats 0 and -2+0 = -2
But i think im not doing it right..

So guys, please help me with that!
any exercises i could do?
Your Forum mate needs your help!
 

shimniok

Member
They are, in fact, circuits.

I had to redraw ex 1. Redraw the 0V power supply as wire that helps simplify. Then you're left with just the one power supply and that makes life easier. Flip the power supply upside down, and call it a +2V supply (make sense?). Then flip the whole circuit upside down. The V3 point is between R1/R2 and R3. So now it's simply a question of finding the equivalent resistance of R1 and R2 in parallel and then using Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Voltage Law.

KVL_ex.png

Ex 2... well... I wonder if we can call the - side of each supply 0V.

If not, I wonder if we can't simply say V1 + V2 = ((R1||R2) + R3) * I then solve for I and use Ohm's law to figure out the voltage drop across R1/R2. Hmmm...

Michael
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top