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ignition module

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induction1

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the ignition module in my car (according to some people) malfunctions due to very high engine heat (and module age). i don't know what's in the module (surely just some ic's), but when it does overheat the car stalls. the car starts when it cools off. if this is the case will an ic resume funcitionality upon cooling, or will it just die. i don't want to buy a new one if it's just going to die again due to heat. obviously i'm not sure if the im is the ultimate problem or not. any ideas? i was thinking about putting a 1/64" piece of aluminum with cooling fins between the module and mount. how about a 1.25"x1.25" peltier junction?
 

Phasor

Member
You may be able to prolong the module's life a little longer by having a cooling method, but ultimately, it will probably die completely, due to degradation. I would start looking for another module (you may be able to find a second-hand one fairly cheaply at a wrecking yard, or a swap-meet).
 

lavenatti

Member
This is not at all uncommon in Fords. If thats what you have, just get it away from the engine heat or heatsink it. A peltier would work great, just remember they draw a good amount of current and the hot side gets hot.
I've seen people pouring water or putting ice on Ford ignition modules more than once. I had a similiar problem but actually traced it back to a faulty voltage regulator. The excess voltage caused the ign. module to overheat.
 

mechie

New Member
Car Ignition Problems

Millions of years ago I saw a problem with a HT lead (carbon composition I think) causing a similar fault - hot = lose a cylinder, cool down = OK again :!:
Given that leads are cheaper than EMUs you could try swapping them first :?:
 

windozeuser

Member
ya that may be caused by the engine heat or a real cheap-o box... that leaves a carbon trace inside the Module and shorts it out. when it is hot it has a very high resistance making the module malfuncution and when it cools it has a lower resistance u should buy i new one and maybe mounting the ignition box on the firewall away from engine heat
 
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