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How to solder onto an Arduino with existing pin headers?

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Using a normal Arduino that comes with pre-installed female pin headers, what is the best way to solder wires onto it?

I know how to solder, but I'm still curious what the easiest way to deal with this is. It is a hassle to remove the pin headers. Is it normal to just solder wires to the underside of the board? Is that considered bad practice?

The reason I want to solder at all is to just make it more permanent and robust than plugging in wires. Perhaps this type of Arduino is not ideal for that, but I've got several on hand and I might as well use them.
 

MikeMl

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Most Helpful Member
I use a male to male header, solder to the short end of the header pins, and then insert the strip into the female header. You have to be quick not to melt the plastic strip...
 

MrAl

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Most Helpful Member
Using a normal Arduino that comes with pre-installed female pin headers, what is the best way to solder wires onto it?

I know how to solder, but I'm still curious what the easiest way to deal with this is. It is a hassle to remove the pin headers. Is it normal to just solder wires to the underside of the board? Is that considered bad practice?

The reason I want to solder at all is to just make it more permanent and robust than plugging in wires. Perhaps this type of Arduino is not ideal for that, but I've got several on hand and I might as well use them.
Hi,

I have not done that YET, but that is what i intended to do with the Due board i have. I need a good 3.3v to 5.0v logic translator, and to use a bidirectional one requires a clamp to the 3.3v supply on the board. If that 3.3v connection ever comes loose even for 100us, it would blow the Due board because the CPU would get damaged. Using a 'jumper' wire that plugs into the header is not a good option because those jumpers are unreliable long term. That means i will solder at least that one wire to the bottom of the board, maybe after a quick test with a jumper.
I intend to do it as fast as possible using just the right temperature, and i may use solder paste instead of regular solder or else very fine wire solder.

I have a lot of experience with the jumpers used on Arduino now, and i can tell you that if you trust them 100 percent then you are in for a big surprise. For example, i have an LCD display hooked up and running almost 24/7 using jumpers, and at first it worked flawlessly. But then after some days or weeks the display started to dim. I found out that it's just the connections to the board with the jumpers, as moving the jumpers around a little brings the brightness back up again (the LED does not get the full current sometimes). So for very important things, solder.

Male headers is a good idea too. They do make a better connection, but because they are plugged in, then can come loose.
I had to use a male header too because i needed more than one I2C connection to a board. One of the boards i use only has one set of I2C pins so i had to make up an adapter that went from two male pins to 6 female pins so i could plug three things in :)
 
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