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How to judge the prospects of a job?

BlackQueen

New Member
This question might be very serious and valueble for young fellows. Any positive idea would be much appreciated.
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You need to be more specific. Do you mean "What are my chances of getting a job (any job)?", or "What promotion opportunities is this particular job likely to offer me?", or ........??
 

Cicero

Active Member
Yeah, a little more specifics would help.

If I took this generally, for someone in an Electronics development role. I feel its easy to get 'pigeon holed' if you're not careful, and once you begin down a certain path you may never be able to come back. So you need to evaluate how taking a particular role could affect your employability in the future. How the experience you will gain will influence the direction your career will take.

Example:
Say you take a role as a pure embedded engineer. Once you do that for a few years, is can be very difficult to change to a more varied role, or to try to dabble in hardware/pcb design. Same thing the other way around as well.

Then again, if you're in a general design role, you may not be able to land speciality positions (pure embedded/pure hw/rf/pcb etc), and you've essentially become a jack of all trades master of none! Never quite being able to specialise.

On another note, Engineers are rather diverse creatures, and often venture into seemingly unrelated industries, such as finance/business management. Once you enter those worlds, its hard to come back.
 

BlackQueen

New Member
Yeah, a little more specifics would help.

If I took this generally, for someone in an Electronics development role. I feel its easy to get 'pigeon holed' if you're not careful, and once you begin down a certain path you may never be able to come back. So you need to evaluate how taking a particular role could affect your employability in the future. How the experience you will gain will influence the direction your career will take.

Example:
Say you take a role as a pure embedded engineer. Once you do that for a few years, is can be very difficult to change to a more varied role, or to try to dabble in hardware/pcb design. Same thing the other way around as well.

Then again, if you're in a general design role, you may not be able to land speciality positions (pure embedded/pure hw/rf/pcb etc), and you've essentially become a jack of all trades master of none! Never quite being able to specialise.

On another note, Engineers are rather diverse creatures, and often venture into seemingly unrelated industries, such as finance/business management. Once you enter those worlds, its hard to come back.
Yes, your suggestion seems helpful. Once you choose a life, with time pass on, you would never easily go back or go to other ways. Perhaps that is a big problem for one to start or restart a career.
 

BlackQueen

New Member
You need to be more specific. Do you mean "What are my chances of getting a job (any job)?", or "What promotion opportunities is this particular job likely to offer me?", or ........??
How should I take this job? What else jobs could I take if I quit this job after a long time?
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
How should I take this job?
Any job advertisement will give contact details, or say how you should apply.
What else jobs could I take if I quit this job after a long time?
That obviously depends on how well your skill set and experience match the requirements of a prospective job.
 

SneaKSz

Member
Yeah, a little more specifics would help.
Then again, if you're in a general design role, you may not be able to land speciality positions (pure embedded/pure hw/rf/pcb etc), and you've essentially become a jack of all trades master of none! Never quite being able to specialise.
I don't fully agree with you.

I'm more in a general design role and I got to experience with embedded design, HW design, PCB design, Pneumatics, Mechanics, Test engineering, which enriched my knowledge and I would rather do this instead of doing etc. HW design all day long.

brgds
 

Cicero

Active Member
I don't fully agree with you.

I'm more in a general design role and I got to experience with embedded design, HW design, PCB design, Pneumatics, Mechanics, Test engineering, which enriched my knowledge and I would rather do this instead of doing etc. HW design all day long.

brgds
I'm the same, also a general design role, and I prefer it as well...for now at least.

But you're missing my point.

What I'm saying is that being in a general role too long might hinder you from being hired into speciality positions in future, should you want to do that.

For example, someone who's been a pure Embedded Engineer for 10years , will be a far more experienced firmware engineer than a general design engineer of 10years. And if the role only contains firmware (speciality) development, then they'd probably hire the Embedded Engineer over you or me.
 

Colin

Active Member
I think you have got the wrong approach from the outset.
I have never had a "job."
I have never gone to "work."
I have always had a CAREER.
I have never counted the hours and never been bored.
Always look upon employment as an adventure. A place to learn, to advance and improve things.
No matter what you do, you can always see room for improvement and even contemplate adding your ideas to the present employment or use them to seek a better position with another company or even implement them yourself.
This is what I have done and I have never looked back.
I have always taught everyone to use their present position as a "stepping stone" to a better, more harmonious life-style.
That's why I say, when you state: "How should I take this job?" use it as an advancement to something you will enjoy and take the improvements you see, to the next interview, and you will have a head-start to working your way up.
 

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