• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

How should I fix this PCB connector?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Ryan Birkenholz

New Member
Hi, I am trying to repair my Onkyo HT-R520 stereo/receiver. The problem is that one or more channels sometimes cuts out. If I tap on the case I can sometimes get it to come back. I took it apart and there are a series of 3 ribbon cables with bare wires connected to a circuit board via this white connecter (see photo below); if you can't see the photo, it is one of those white connectors soldered to the board where bare wires are inserted and metal tabs hold the wires in place, then you put a plastic cap over them to secure it. I am almost positive the problem I am experiencing is because I am not getting a good enough connection through these connectors. I tried to carefully bend the metal tabs back a bit to provide more pressure, but it still isn't working. I was thinking that maybe I would just buy a different style of connector (perhaps a more secure plug-style). What would you suggest to fix this? I can't solder the wires directly to the board because I can't access the solder joints unless I disassemble it, and disassembly would be impossible without removing the wire.

here is link to the photo:
http://www.ryanbirkenholz.com/images/PCBconn.jpg

 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Have a look at the connector pins on the solder side of the PCB.
It could be that one or more of the connector pins has broken away from the solder. This can be quite difficult to see sometimes.
If in doubt just melt the existing solder with your soldering iron, suck it out with the de-soldering tool and apply new solder.

JimB
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Another thing you could try is to clean and re tin the bare wires that go into the socket on the board, but use proper lead/tin solder. Once you have re tinned the wires clean off all flux.

spec
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
it is one of those white connectors soldered to the board where bare wires are inserted and metal tabs hold the wires in place, then you put a plastic cap over them to secure it.
That's not really correct, you don't 'put a plastic cap over them', it's an integral part of the connector. To remove or insert the wires you slide the outer part of the socket upwards, insert/remove the wires, then slide the outer part back down to lock it in place.

You've not done the socket much good by ripping it apart :D

However, these types of connectors are VERY reliable, but if you're confident it's faulty the best solution is to remove the socket and solder the wires in place - even if it's difficult to do so.
 

TWTRTECH

New Member
That particular connector requires you to push down on the tab, then the pressure releases on the bare wire so you can pull the wire out, to install the wire back you push the tab again as you slide the wire in, and yes, not a good idea to totally remove the tab as the pressure stays on those wires.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top