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Holiday Cooking

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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I served a dish for our Thanksgiving holiday this year and received great reviews, so I thought I might share this tasty dish with all of you.

Seasons Greetings:)

Michael’s Famous Pork Tenderloin

Pork often has the stigma of being a unhealthy form of protein as it is often thought to be a very lipid rich meat, I am here to dispel that myth.

Pork tenderloin is a beautiful cut of meat, low in fat, tender, scrumptious, and sure to bring a smile.

So if I have wetted your appetite and you want to know more about this delightful dish, read on.

What you need:

· 1 package of bacon
· Jim Beam BBQ sauce
· Pork tenderloin, 1.5 to 2 pounds. (I prefer Farmers John brand, available at Vons)
· Olive oil
· Seasoning, I use pepper, onion and garlic salt (Make sure garlic salt has no NACL). One more note about seasoning, do not, I repeat, do not use any salt. Any first year chemistry student will tell you that the salt will cause a osmotic pressure gradient and will suck the moisture right out of your otherwise juicy tenderloin, so don’t use any salt.

Preparation:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
2. Spread olive oil on bottom of your 6x12 or so, baking dish.
3. Place pork in baking dish. Pour olive oil on pork and spread evenly (do not be shy with olive oil, it is good for you). Now season pork with pepper and garlic salt ( don’t hold back). Using the JB BBQ sauce coat the pork with a nice layer.
4. Take about 3 to 4 slices of bacon and wrap them around the pork in a helical fashion. Good News! The hard part is done. At this point, your hands must be pretty messy, go wash em for Pete’s sake.

Cooking:

Place your pork dish in the center rack of oven, do not cover. Cook at 350 degree F for 20 minutes and then turn oven temperature down to 325 degrees. Rule of thumb is 20 minutes per pound, but I prefer going by meat temperature. Pork is considered done at 160 degrees so I take the meat out around 153 degrees and allow meat to rest.

Some additional notes:

While meat is cooking, I usually baste the meat with the juices in the cooking dish, key is to keep meat moist.

Cut meat into small slabs, ¼ to ½ inch slices, serve and observe happy faces J

Remember, when asked for recipe, Old family secret.
 
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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Perhaps a good prime rib roast.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Looks like a good thread to post a picture of a beautiful, female chef. Then again I might get chastized by a certain cracker claiming nonsense posting!:p I might as well keep it serious by posting this pic instead:

9314-chef-goofy.jpg
 

Boncuk

New Member
Well, I got it all done until no2.

Preheated to exactly 350 degrees (hard to get there, but made it) and then put the oil into the pan - and had it: Sudden smoke development and an explosion.

Sorry I couldn't respond earlier. The doctor was busy trying to peel off the burnt skin.

Why the hell didn't you say degrees Fahrenheit? :confused::confused:

Boncuk
 

Boncuk

New Member
Looks like a good thread to post a picture of a beautiful, female chef. Then again I might get chastized by a certain cracker claiming nonsense posting!:p I might as well keep it serious by posting this pic instead:

9315-chef-goofy.jpg

OK, please send it to me via Skype: hermanthegerman421. I like female chefs.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Well, I got it all done until no2.

Preheated to exactly 350 degrees (hard to get there, but made it) and then put the oil into the pan - and had it: Sudden smoke development and an explosion.

Sorry I couldn't respond earlier. The doctor was busy trying to peel off the burnt skin.

Why the hell didn't you say degrees Fahrenheit? :confused::confused:

Boncuk

Since most household ovens don't go beyond 260 deg C, I thought it was obvious. :rolleyes:
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
OK, please send it to me via Skype: hermanthegerman421. I like female chefs.
Google female chefs on your own, mister! ;)
 

jpanhalt

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Love pork tenderloin. Nothing beats Iowa pork. Just ask Senator Grassley. Hormel is the brand. When I come back from that area, my suitcase is always packed with cryovac'd tenderloins from Iowa.

John
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Tenderloins from most animals is the choicest cut. I always remove the tenderloins myself from wild game before sending them to the processors. Often processors will save them for themselves and many guys won't be aware of getting robbed of them. Of course now-a-days I process my own wild game or side of beef so it's no longer an issue. Tenderloins make excellent butterfly steaks. That's one cut of meat that's worthy of spending the effort to prepare properly and tastefully.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
I've been cooking on this reliable ol' gal for quite some time now.

9322-easy-bake-oven.jpg
 

psecody

Member
Nice recipe I'll have to try it while I'm home for Christmas. I wish I had a good one to post up but as I'm a poor college kid I eat pretty cheap. Though I ate pretty good last year because I worked in a meat market so I could mark things down and buy them. I could get a 1" ribeye for about $1.50.

Well I guess I could give ya'll the way I cook my steaks it's pretty simple.
Best steaks to get are either a ribeye or I've actually come to like flat iron steaks as well, they're chuck (from the shoulder) and they don't really have a lot of fat on them at all so if thats a concern for you flat iron steaks would probably be a healthier alternative to ribeyes, plus they are actually to really tender. I marinate my steaks in lemon juice for about 3-4 hours, the lemon juice works in two ways the acidity of the lemon juice acts as a tenderizer on the meat and also adds a tart citrusy taste to the meat. Then cook the steak on the grill and cover it in cayenne and a little bit of lawry's seasoning salt. Most people argue with me on this next part saying "a good steak doesn't need steak sauce" but honestly I don't think I have ever had a good steak then because I have to have some A1 on it to complete it plus the tart taste of the A1 goes really well with the hint of citrus flavor in the steak.
 
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HiTech

Well-Known Member
Aren't those things darn funny? I remember buying the refill packs and cooking chocolate cakes with my sister. I think it used a 100w light bulb as the heat source, or may it was a bit lower wattage bulb? Mom would make dinner while us kids baked the dessert!
 
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