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Help with wiring up a IEC320 C14 socket

StealthRT

Member
Hey all i purchased this on ebay and wanted to verify that i have the pinout's correct before i go and hook it all up to live wires :)

Here is the socket:



and here is the data on it:
Product Name: Power Socket w Switch Fuse
Material (External): Plastic, Metal
Power Supply: 10A 250V
Plug Type: 3 Pin IEC320 C14
Description:
3 pin IEC320 C14 plug, 7 terminals, is used widely in lab equipment, medical devices, fitness equipment, industrial automation equipment, etc. Use only with a 250V fuse.
I will be bypassing the fuse since this is being spliced into a surge protector. So that being said i was thinking this is how it would hook up:



What i can not figure out (or find a pin out of) is the on/off switch on the top. It has 4 terminals and im not sure which is in and what is out and how the 3 wires hook to it?

Any help would be great! :)

David
 

duffy

New Member
The two on the top connect together, and the two on the bottom connect together (left-right) when the switch is thrown. Top 2 are isolated from bottom 2.
 

duffy

New Member
Also notice the two little wires on the leftmost lugs. See them? Those are for the neon light. Those lugs should be on the "load" side of the switch.
 

Attachments

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NOBYKOBE

New Member
what are the white and black lines as i only have one load coming out , which one do i connect to a transformer for example?! and how can i connect this View attachment 68148
thanks for your help
 
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KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Duffy has it basically right, but you were asked what country your from or what is the mains supply in your country?

The ebay listing is labeled 250 V, so therefore I would suspect that the lamp (lighted switch) is for 250 V.

In the US, you normally don't switch the Neutral, but inside a device it's usually permissable.

The switch is a DPST or Double Pole Single Throw. The note that the load should be on the same side as the small wires for the light is a good one.

US colors are N=White, L=Black and Ground = Green.

There is IEC colors of green with yellow which is ground and blue and brown which I don't have a good way of remembering.

In the US, what I would do is align the plug with an outlet and identify the wide side. This is Neutral. Then you can use an ohmmeter to identify the Neutral terminal. So without having data, that method works.

If your in a 120 V territory, then the lamp may be dim or not light at all.

The green wire goes to any exposed metal or a metal case.

At only one point for the entire house N is connected to Ground or Earth. Ground only carries fault currents.

Do, you see why the country or mains voltage is required?

In any event, if you are on a 120 V system, you should see 120V between L and N and 120 V between G and L and approximately 0 V AC between N and G. Phantom voltages can occur if the connection is high resistance. So, 60 V means something is wrong and it's a common value to see.
 

dougy83

Well-Known Member
You're about a year too late to this party, KISS
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I've seen some posts on the net saying to never solder mains cables as the solder could melt.
What a lot of nonsense!

If it is getting so hot that the solder melts, then you have much bigger problems than the solder melting. :eek:

The power supply in your link appears to have screw terminals.
What I would do with that is to solder my wires to a "ring tag" and put the screw of the PSU terminal through the ring of the ring tag.
However, I am guessing that you dont have any of that, so, just wrap the stripped wire end around the screw terminal and tighten.
Be carefull to not have any loose strands of wire sticking out from under the screw.

JimB
 

MeatPlatter

New Member
Thanks Jim, that's great! There's too much nonsense on the internet.

The ring tags sound like a good idea, I'll get some of them too.
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
You folks do realize this thread is from 2011, right?
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Yes Mat, but it was reasonably revived by MeatPlatter with a thankyou comment and a follow-up question.

JimB
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Yes Mat, but it was reasonably revived by MeatPlatter with a thankyou comment and a follow-up question.

JimB
Hmm, missed that somehow. Thanks Jim :p
 

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