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Help wanted to power an AC120v induction motor ( edited from Brushless motor - thank you @SHORTBUS= )

Grounded

New Member
Hi, Hello everyone
I am glad Google brought me here. Sooo many awesome ideas and discussions being shared that I almost forgot the reason for becoming a member.
I need to power up a brushless AC ( thank you SHORTBUS= )120v induction motor. It's a pull from an older washing machine. The powering harness has five connectors in two distinct groups ( see picture please - and I apologize for the crud on the motor ). Here are my readings with multi meter:

RED / Purple .... ( continuity ) 0.4 ohm
Blue / Yellow .... ( continuity ) 2.8 ohm
Blue / Orange .... ( continuity ) 2.8 ohm

Orange / Yellow .... ( continuity ) 0.4 ohm
( RED is connected to a starter CAP )

At the first stage I need to test the motor for functionality and just make it run ( 120v ) and then if the motor has the capability of two speeds, I like to wire it with switches for running it at desired available speeds.

Any help will be greatly appreciated

1.jpg
 
Last edited:

Grounded

New Member
You may be using the wrong term for you motor. A brushless motor is a DC motor, your AC motor is more than likely an induction motor, a capacitor start induction motor.
You are correct. I will edit and correct the original posting if possible on this forum. BTW, the term brushless motor is used on Youtube often to describe in general all washing machine motors that " are not brushed ". But we are not on Youtube here and I should've been more cognizant of standards.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A google search found this wiring diagram - on here!

It's not exactly the same motor, but a rather similar GE one.
The low resistance red to violet / white start winding seems to match up.

This setup has a set of reversing contacts to change the start winding circuit phasing in relation to the main windings, then the appropriate two of the other connections select the speed range.

2-jpg.99031



It's from this thread:
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You are correct. I will edit and correct the original posting if possible on this forum. BTW, the term brushless motor is used on Youtube often to describe in general all washing machine motors that " are not brushed ". But we are not on Youtube here and I should've been more cognizant of standards.
They may actually be talking about brushless (BLDC) motors on Youtube. there are some washers being made that have them, one make is the Fisher-Paykel, most of their appliances have BLDC motors.
 

Grounded

New Member
After carefully studying the suggestions and provided information, I went back to my shop and cleaned the harness and terminals. Behold - now the RED / Purple reads 7.2 ohms and we have a starter coil. I grounded the motor's body and powered the harness ( with the CAP inline ) and we have a lift off. I let it run for about ten minutes while constantly checking for over heating the CAP. The only thing that got a bit warm was the motor's body. Capacitor remained at room temperature.
One wire remains unused ( Orange ) and I'm not sure what it may do. At this point I don't really need to know about the orange cable. I have a running motor and I can push ahead my project.
I am considering using a treadmill DC motor instead and use a cheap and cheerful PWM speed controller for ( almost ) continuous speed adjustability.
Thank you very much everybody. I couldn't do this without your help
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
One wire remains unused ( Orange ) and I'm not sure what it may do.
It again appears to match the motor in the circuit above - Orange is the motor power neutral, to a thermal overload.

Yellow is the other side of the overload, connecting to the main windings and brought out to feed the start winding control circuit, so that is also cut off in case of an overheat shutdown

The change in resistance between red & purple may be the starter switch contacts moving slightly as you moved the motor around.
From the drawing, it should have an internal centrifugal switch to disconnect the starter circuit once it's spinning.

The starter winding is usually very low impedance and will burn out if it's left connected for more than a few seconds at a time, hence the internal switch.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Although the start winding is usually much higher resistance/impedance than the run winding on an AC induction motor.
It is the start-only bi-polar type capacitor that can be destroyed if in circuit more than a few seconds.
 

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