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Help me identify some connectors

L_Delorme

New Member
Hi all,

I’m new to this forum and to PCB design in general. I am having difficulties identifying some old connectors. I’m trying to create an adapter board to replace an old PSU’s innards with modern ATX ones (the board in question will serve other functions as well...more on that later). The thing is, I’d like to reuse the same type of connectors, and I don't know exactly what they are since there's no schematic available for this old PSU. Anyway, here are the connectors:

IMG_6149.jpg IMG_6151.jpg IMG_6150.jpg

The spade connector (left of 2nd pic) wasn’t difficult to identify. I’ll get measurements from the male connector and I’ll be able to find a new one easily.

On the other hand, I can’t find what the other single wire one is (the banana looking one). The male PCB connector is to the right of pic #1 (about 1cm high) and the wire/female connector is to the right of the second picture. Any ideas what it could be?

The third and last connector/receptacle appears to be a 2 pin Molex 5277 09-65-2029 (or compatible with at least, right?).

All three types of connectors are used to "transport" AC power (phase + neutral) from the C14 plugs at the back of the old PSU (one is a monitor pass through, the other is the power input) to the main board.

Any help deeply appreciated!
Thanks!
 
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AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The spade connectors (called "Faston" by AMP and quick-disconnects by others) come in three widths: 0.110", 0.187" and 0.250". Common thicknesses are 0.025" and 0.031". The pink one in the photo looks like 0.187", and the pink color indicates it is sized for wires in the 18-22 GA range. Looks like an AMP part from a reel.

The 2-pin in the first photo probably has a pin spacing of 0.156", with the center pin removed to provide a sufficient creepage distance to pass safety certification. The unused center pin in the right photo is plugged to prevent improper connection. AMP. Molex, Panduit, and lotsa others make compatible parts.

ak
 

L_Delorme

New Member
Thank you AnalogKid! I only need the receptacles (I'll keep the wires from the original PSU), so I should be good for those two.
Still having problems with the last one though (right of first pic)...

-> gophert: I plan on making this mod reversible so that you could still plug the original PSU back in... so that solution is out I'm afraid.
 
Last edited:

L_Delorme

New Member
I found the perfect replacement pin for my application.

I only have one question left regarding crimp/solder on connectors. The motherboard cables were directly soldered to the PSU using some of those terminals. They look like this:
Bildschirmfoto 2020-03-03 um 14.12.36.png

They apparently give more strength to the connection but according to Molex's website, they are being phased out.
The question is, do I really need those?

Many thanks again for your help!
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
In a volume manufacturing environment, twisting the strands of a wire so they don't flare out when trying to poke the wire into a hole is massively time-consuming, very inconsistent, and dangerous. Strands that did not get soldered can break off and get into all sorts of bad places. Often the part you show has a tine on the back side so that once the wire end is in the hole it cannot back out. This holds the wire in place during wave soldering.

If you are dealing with stranded wires in pc board holes in volume, seriously consider this type of termination.

AMP (Tyco) also makes them, as does someone else with an A ... Accupin or something like that.

ak
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Also, soldering stranded wire creates huge stress on only a few of the individual wires when the wire is moved or vibrates so it is highly frowned upon - especially in Automotive. Crimping some type of pin to the strands and mounting into some type of connector with strain relief is highly preferred (even the extra little crimp onto the insulation in post #6 counts as strain relief. .
 

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