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Help getting started with AT89 series

Discussion in '8051/8951' started by breakshift, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. breakshift

    breakshift Member

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    I'm completely new to microcontrollers so please bear with me. I've tried to read around as much as I can but I'm just lost.

    I'm working on a project that I want to integrate this into:

    http://www.8051projects.net/download-d221-frequency-counter-using-at89c2051-lcd-assembly.html

    So I bought the AT89C2051 microcontroller and went to the Atmel website to find out how to program it. Ended up buying the Atmel JTAGICE3 programmer device that claims to program any AVR microcontroller. My problem is I haven't a clue how to use the programmer to upload the program file provided on the website above. The JTAGICE3 manual on the Atmel website has information relating to connecting it to a JTAG, aWire, PDI, debugWIRE, SPI or SWD target. The datasheet for my microcontroller contains no mention of any of these terms and the pin-out doesn't correspond at all to the JTAGICE3 pins described in the manual.

    Clearly I'm missing something here? Are the two devices not compatible?
     
  2. Ian Rogers

    Ian Rogers Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    The AT89 series are NOT!!! AVR micros... They are Intel 8051 compatible micros and depending whether they are parallel or ISP flash types determines the circuitry you need...

    I moved to Philips for that same reason... Phillips chips come with a bootloader, so they are easily programmed.

    If you move to an Atmel AT89sxxx ( note the "S" ) you can use the simple interface..
     
  3. breakshift

    breakshift Member

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    Okay so 8051 microcontrollers are a different architecture and so fundamentally a different micro altogether? Requiring a different programmer device?

    I'm going to try and use a ATtiny instead then - this seems a bit more beginner-friendly. I've found some AVR information and some C code for frequency counters and for pushing text to a LCD screen so I'll try to combine the two programs.

    Out of interest, as far as I can tell Atmel don't supply a programmer for the 8051 architecture - why not?
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Ian Rogers

    Ian Rogers Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Because they are cluncky..

    The "C" type has a byte wide programming interface... All of port 1 is used along with the Vpp and several other pins..
    The "S" type can be programmed serially it's easier to program..

    Like I said.. The near exact Philips P89C52RD2 has a boot loader and is a dodle to program...
     
  6. Jon Wilder

    Jon Wilder Active Member

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    If you go with the AT89S series, you can use Atmel's AT89ISP programmer. This is what Ian is referring to as the "simple" interface. The AT89S series are programmed in serial fashion.

    The catch with the AT89ISP programmer is that you have to use a computer with a parallel port. Other than that it's a super simple programmer to use.

    http://www.amazon.com/ATMEL-AT89ISP-PROGRAMMER-CABLE-AT89LP/dp/B00DJUI61S

    The Intel MCS-51 architechture (i.e. 8051) is quite different from Atmel AVR. While the AVR "borrowed" a bit from the 8051, they're still far from the same. While the MCS-51 architecture is technically "old", they're still considered a workhorse processor and I find them super fun to code.

    If you want to learn about the MCS-51 family, I highly recommend visiting the 8052.com site. There is a plethora of information on the MCS-51 family of microcontrollers on that site. It's what got me going on the architecture when I first started it -

    http://www.8052.com
     

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