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AtomSoft

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Hello everyone my name is Jason. As all probably guessed im new to this stuff. Didnt take any courses or nothing im more of a self teacher. I learned how to repair pcs and stuff by myself. I want to get into the making of all this stuff little by little so my question is

Any idea on what a nooB should learn first? I know a little about Boolean Logic, Electronic Gates, Bits and Bytes and basic stuff like that. Now i want to put it to use.

Can someone give me a small project/idea on something i can try to make. I love researching things. I was gonna try to make a simple RS232 To TTL converter (since i have 2 new MAX232AEJE 16PIN DIP chips) . So any thoughts or suggestions would be really appreciated. (sorry aif i spelled anything wrong)
 

Hero999

Banned
Ohm's law, is probably the first thing you should learn, followed quickly by diodes, capacitors, transistors and op-amps.
 

quixotron

New Member
AtomSoft said:
Hello everyone my name is Jason. As all probably guessed im new to this stuff. Didnt take any courses or nothing im more of a self teacher. I learned how to repair pcs and stuff by myself. I want to get into the making of all this stuff little by little so my question is

Any idea on what a nooB should learn first? I know a little about Boolean Logic, Electronic Gates, Bits and Bytes and basic stuff like that. Now i want to put it to use.

Can someone give me a small project/idea on something i can try to make. I love researching things. I was gonna try to make a simple RS232 To TTL converter (since i have 2 new MAX232AEJE 16PIN DIP chips) . So any thoughts or suggestions would be really appreciated. (sorry aif i spelled anything wrong)
1: Get a good micro-electronics book. ut start with a electric circuits book.
2: invest in a used but good spectrum analyzer, oscillioscope and soldering tools. If you can get your hands on a working network analyzer...i'd get it. but a cheap one is probably 8000 USD.
3:What aspect of self-taught electrical engineering do you want to do? Do you want to specialize or just be a good handy man/tinkerer?

Yes if you like programming and signals and systems, get "Digital Video Electronics with 12 Complete Projects". covers alot of basics and advanced concepts of digital video engineering.
 

AtomSoft

Well-Known Member
Wow thx for all the info as you can expect 8000 is outa the price range lol. Um but i will take a look at all that . Thanks

I am looking into the aspect of tinkerer lol But mostly on the infared/bluetooth (wireless transportation of data) and also HID (like mouses and stuff). Basically i want to learn a lot of things or a little of a lot of things.

Thanks again i will look into all that information you guys posted.
 

Brian Hoskins

New Member
Check the book I reviewed in the books section of this forum - it's called Electronic Systems and the topics covered make it a good book for beginners. One thing I did find when I started learning was that the assumed maths level was a little high for me but regardless of that it's still an excellent book.

The Art of Electronics is an even better book, although I'm not sure where you'd find a copy of that anymore...

Brian
 

Hero999

Banned
quixotron said:
invest in a used but good spectrum analyzer, oscillioscope and soldering tools. If you can get your hands on a working network analyzer...i'd get it. but a cheap one is probably 8000 USD.
An oscilloscope may be but I disagree about the spectrum and network analyser which are niceties and are only required if you want to get in to RF engineering.
 

eblc1388

Active Member
Brian Hoskins said:
The Art of Electronics is an even better book, although I'm not sure where you'd find a copy of that anymore...
Why? It is for sale in many big book stores and Amazon.co.uk.
 

Brian Hoskins

New Member
eblc1388 said:
Why? It is for sale in many big book stores and Amazon.co.uk.
Oh right ok - it's an old book so I didn't think it would still be in print. If it's readily available then I think it should be recommended. I would imagine it's quite pricey though? Ebay might be a better idea...

Brian
 

quixotron

New Member
Hero999 said:
An oscilloscope may be but I disagree about the spectrum and network analyser which are niceties and are only required if you want to get in to RF engineering.
Well he is gonna need it if he wants to work in wireless. alot of the antenna and RFIC devices are in the s band region. a 216 mhz signal generator and standard oscilloscope won't cut it!!
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I also found it strange that you would advise a newby to,
2: invest in a used but good spectrum analyzer, oscillioscope and soldering tools. If you can get your hands on a working network analyzer...i'd get it. but a cheap one is probably 8000 USD.
Mike.
 

AtomSoft

Well-Known Member
elvis looks cool! But wouldnt know the first thing on using it. i say if your a begginer like me then you should stick with a normal breadboard and learn the basics then go out and buy something advanced for learning more and producing a quality product.
 

Hero999

Banned
quixotron said:
Well he is gonna need it if he wants to work in wireless. alot of the antenna and RFIC devices are in the s band region. a 216 mhz signal generator and standard oscilloscope won't cut it!!
Ever heard of wireless modules?
 

AtomSoft

Well-Known Member
Ok i get the concept of Diodes and Transistors. But im confused on how to use them. Ill ask about diodes first.

If i have a 3v input and 1 diode the output is assumed to be around 2.6v right?
Now to go down from 2.4v to 1.4V i need a resistor right. But how would i know what size resistor to use?

Do i have to use like a digital multimeter to get the A/mA(I) in the current circuit first?

How do i calculate what resistor would be needed? Or would i need to know the resistance of the diode and A/mA(I) of the circuit?

You see where i am confused?
 

Hero999

Banned
Diodes very good voltage droppers because their voltage drop will vary with the forward current.

You can measure the current by connecting the multimeter in series with the circuit you're measuring.

Use Ohm's law to calaculate the resistor value required for the current needed to power the LED.
 
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