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Guitar Pre-amp

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apakhira

New Member
Hi
I decided on making a guitar pre-amp, with an EQ (equalizer) so i could play my guitar with a normal amp, as well as use it as a DI (Direct Input) box for my PC. I have also decided to integrate a distortion effect into the thing, and since i have the distortion and pre-amp in a single unit, i want 2 wire the thing for a clean channel, a distorton channel, and a distortion + gain boost (with the pre-amp) channel.
Now my questions are,
Where in the chain should i put the EQ?
How will each position of the EQ in the chain affect the sound?
And, for the Distortion+Gain boost, should i put the pre-amp before the distortion or after the distortion to have less problems (like oscillation, etc)?
And a final dumb question: do i have to change component values in the EQ
(op-amp-based), if my supply voltage is going to be less than that in the schematic?

Thanks

EDIT: Converted to full English
 
Last edited:

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Mostly it's personal preference, but for a start I would suggest typing your questions in English?, your stupid 'text speak' will only result in your questions being ignored!.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
apakhira said:
So now is it better?
Yes, if you expect adult replies you should ask in an adult fashion, I've no problem with 'text speak' on a phone, you only have a very crude keypad to type on, but it's of no use whatsoever on a full ASCII keyboard!.

As suggested, you shouldn't need to change values for a supply change, opamps are VERY good for that - if it was built using discrete transistors you almost certainly would!.

As for the position of the EQ and distortion modules, their position will make subtle changes to the sound - I would suggest wiring them as seperate modules, and you can then try connecting them different ways to see which you prefer - you could even have then switchable?.

Don't forget, for a passive guitar you need a high input impedance, 470kohm and above is usual.
 

Dr.EM

New Member
You set the impedance of the op-amp using a suitable resistor. In a non-inverting design, you could have just the inpedance of the op-amp, but it is likely this impedance will be too high and it will have problems with noise.
 
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