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Graphics Editors- which program?

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spec

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Hi all,

On another thread Les Jones and I briefly discussed graphics editors (post #132 @ http://www.electro-tech-online.com/threads/lm723-psu-with-0v-lowest-voltage.148899/page-7)

I have been looking for a convenient, but powerful, vector graphics editing program for years.

I started with MicroSoft Visio, but the early versions were quirky, so I moved on to AutoDesk AutoCad, but for casual use AutoCad is a bit cumbersome.

I then used MicroSoft PowerPoint for a while, which has a slick user interface, but is a touch limited

Then, when MicroSoft upgraded Word to include WordDraw, I used that which was quite good. But then MicroSoft messed up WordDraw with their context sensitive menus and made it tortuous to use. Although that could be sorted by configuring a custom user interface, but I can't be bothered to do that.

I have even used Adobe Photoshop, but that is a bitmap graphics editor rather than vector graphics editor, and is a bit cumbersome for editing.

Recently, I had another look at vector graphics editing programs and found that Adobe Illustrator is the top rated program, and that InkScape, which is free, is also pretty good.

I was just wondering what graphics editing programs other member's use and what their experiences have been.

spec
 
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Ian Rogers

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Windows paint 7+ is my best friend most operations are vector based ( until enter is pressed )

The other program I like is Open Office Draw... This is mighty powerful vector drawing with add and subtract.. You can make any shape you want..
 

spec

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Windows paint 7+ is my best friend most operations are vector based ( until enter is pressed )

The other program I like is Open Office Draw... This is mighty powerful vector drawing with add and subtract.. You can make any shape you want..
Thanks for info Ian,

Is there a Windows Paint for Win 10?

I have tried Open Office programs and found them to be pretty good, especially as they are free, but not tried Open Office Draw.

spec
 

ClydeCrashKop

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PaintShop Pro (PSP) is a raster and vector graphics editor for Microsoft Windows. It was originally published by Jasc Software. In October 2004, Corel purchased Jasc Software and the distribution rights to Paint Shop Pro.
I like version 6. I don't know if Corel ruined it like they did their own program in the mid 1990's.

The help file is a book style manual. I played with curving, warping, twisting text but haven't used it much.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PaintShop_Pro

Use your own discretion downloading it free from this site.
http://www.oldversion.com/windows/paint-shop-pro/
http://www.oldversion.com/windows/paint-shop-pro-6-02
 

spec

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PaintShop Pro (PSP) is a raster and vector graphics editor for Microsoft Windows. It was originally published by Jasc Software. In October 2004, Corel purchased Jasc Software and the distribution rights to Paint Shop Pro.
I like version 6. I don't know if Corel ruined it like they did their own program in the mid 1990's.

The help file is a book style manual. I played with curving, warping, twisting text but haven't used it much.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PaintShop_Pro

Use your own discretion downloading it free from this site.
http://www.oldversion.com/windows/paint-shop-pro/
http://www.oldversion.com/windows/paint-shop-pro-6-02
Thanks CCK,

I have tried PSP, but only for photo editing, like Photoshop, and found it to have a nice simple interface.
PSP seems to resize images better than Photoshop, at one time that is.

spec
 

KMoffett

Well-Known Member
I downloaded this "diaw.exe 0.97.2", but haven't had time to work with it. It might be what you want, but not sure if it's vector graphics.

Ken
 

eTech

Well-Known Member
Hi

I use Paint Dot Net for bit mapped graphics editor (its free)
Used for Image capture and editing.

I use Microsoft Visio 2010 for vector graphics editing.
Used for General drawing, schematic, Mechanical drawing.

I use these with Windows 10
 

spec

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Many thanks everybody- I didn't expect so much useful information.:cool:

spec
 

ronsimpson

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I really liked Visio but the price to upgrade drove me away.
I often use Eagle Cad to do drawings. I know it is the wrong program but I know it well. (layout not sch.)
I fight with SketchUp. I think it is the right program but I just can't get it into my head. (3D drawings)
 

spec

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I really liked Visio but the price to upgrade drove me away.
I often use Eagle Cad to do drawings. I know it is the wrong program but I know it well. (layout not sch.)
I fight with SketchUp. I think it is the right program but I just can't get it into my head. (3D drawings)
I haven't used Visio since it first came out when it was a touch quirky, as mentioned before. But, no doubt, the modern Visio is vastly improved. Unfortunately, the Office Suite, I have does not include Visio.

Hmm, using Eagle layout is a new slant. I have never used Eagle layout.

How strange about your views about SketchUp- I think exactly the same which is odd because most people find SketchUp dead easy. My son, for example, took to SketchUp like a duck to water and can knock out some incredible 3D drawings in minutes. On the other hand he can't get on with AutoCad, which I like, for its precision and facilities- but the interface takes some getting used to.

spec
 

Ian Rogers

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I haven't used Visio since it first came out when it was a touch quirky, as mentioned before. But, no doubt, the modern Visio is vastly improved. Unfortunately, the Office Suite, I have does not include Visio.
As I said before.. Open Office Draw is very similar to illustrator... There's a lot it can do...
 

ronsimpson

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Eagle layout is a new slant. I have never used Eagle layout.
I can draw a line, change it color, width, then change one end, then connect it to another line. (vector editing)
I can see videos of other people drawing very fast.
In the youtube video I can see that I can make a cube in 1 second. But I want a cube 1"x1"x2". And now I know I can type that into a window.
Then I want to connect another cube to one edge of the first. And with a mouse it is hard for me. In CAD programs I can attach objects, define where they are and move 0.01". I just can't see how it works in Sketch. On the video they just push two objects together. But when I do it one will be slightly inside the other. Or they will not align. And moving some small amount until they connect just does not work. I think my problem is I came from pre-mouse CAD. Where you typed "cube, 1.0,1.0,2.0 at 3,7,9" and it works. In the "simple" programs you move the mouse. Maybe what I need is "snap to grid". What happens to me is I get a cube that is 1.001, 0.98, 2.1 at 3.98734, 6.7, 9.010001 and when I try to fix it the thing gets rotated by 3.579 degrees. Then I really can't fix it. Then two lines I thought were connected fall apart and two other lines become connected. Maybe the problem is I can't draw 4 line and say that is a square. I must draw a square. Maybe I am thinking lines and not objects.

I remember trying to teach my GrandDad to use a computer. And now it is me! And some 8 year old will say "let me do it".
Not really that bad, but getting there.
 

spec

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Most Helpful Member
I can draw a line, change it color, width, then change one end, then connect it to another line. (vector editing)

I can see videos of other people drawing very fast.
In the youtube video I can see that I can make a cube in 1 second. But I want a cube 1"x1"x2". And now I know I can type that into a window.
Then I want to connect another cube to one edge of the first. And with a mouse it is hard for me. In CAD programs I can attach objects, define where they are and move 0.01". I just can't see how it works in Sketch. On the video they just push two objects together. But when I do it one will be slightly inside the other. Or they will not align. And moving some small amount until they connect just does not work. I think my problem is I came from pre-mouse CAD. Where you typed "cube, 1.0,1.0,2.0 at 3,7,9" and it works. In the "simple" programs you move the mouse. Maybe what I need is "snap to grid". What happens to me is I get a cube that is 1.001, 0.98, 2.1 at 3.98734, 6.7, 9.010001 and when I try to fix it the thing gets rotated by 3.579 degrees. Then I really can't fix it. Then two lines I thought were connected fall apart and two other lines become connected. Maybe the problem is I can't draw 4 line and say that is a square. I must draw a square. Maybe I am thinking lines and not objects.

I remember trying to teach my GrandDad to use a computer. And now it is me! And some 8 year old will say "let me do it".
Not really that bad, but getting there.
Once again Ron, similar to my experience.

I designed a house that we were building and I just could not get the precision with Sketch-Up, but with AutoCad the drawings came out well.

I know what you mean about young people and computers- they seem to pop out knowing about computers and mobile phones these days. When I got a new camera I was having trouble finding how to get a certain function and an eight-year-old showed me how and looked at me in a most condescending way.

My son (now 46) can do things with computers/mobile phones that I would not think possible- half the time he types so fast that I can't see his fingers moving- but he still has to ask Dad about any hardware problems.:D

spec
 

throbscottle

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Not had much call to use vector graphics, but I've used Inkscape and liked it. I don't know about the newer versions, but the old versions of MS Word (eg in Office 2000) had more capable drawing than you'd think from first look.
I tried to use the graphics in OOo - couldn't get along with it. I used QCad a bit, was good once I understood how it works. Also I occasionally use XFig. You have to make good use of layers for it to be really effective.
If you are doing front panel layout, Front Panel Designer is good, though they want you to buy their fab service.
 

spec

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Not had much call to use vector graphics, but I've used Inkscape and liked it. I don't know about the newer versions, but the old versions of MS Word (eg in Office 2000) had more capable drawing than you'd think from first look.
I tried to use the graphics in OOo - couldn't get along with it. I used QCad a bit, was good once I understood how it works. Also I occasionally use XFig. You have to make good use of layers for it to be really effective.
If you are doing front panel layout, Front Panel Designer is good, though they want you to buy their fab service.
Interesting that you liked InkScape- I have been wrestling with Adobe Illustrator for the last four hours, and while I can do some fantastic things quickly with it, I feel as though it is controlling me, rather than the other way around.:arghh:

That was my experience with the early versions of Word up to Word 2007 (I think). The capability is still there, but like I said, the context sensitive menus make WordDraw all but impossible to use.

Not familiar with the other packages you mention.

spec
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
Ah, my mistake, I thought you'd said you'd used OOo (Open Office .org).
Getting used to using vectors is all a bit alien when you get beyond the stuff Word et al gives you. Once you "get it" of course, it's brilliant!
I use Linux so I'm used to stuff that comes with it and rarely needing to look further. I think QCad is available for windows, and Front Panel Designer is a windows program (I run it using wine) and if you wanted to try Xfig you would probably need cygwin as I don't think there's a windows version. They're all free anyway.
If it's diagrams you are drawing (which I believe was Visio's original purpose) you can do worse than Dia, which also has libraries of standard symbols for various things. Again, you'd probably need cygwin (of which I have exactly no experience btw).
 

tomizett

Active Member
I've heard good things about Dia, too, although I've not tried it myself.
QCad has now parted company from its originators Ribbonsoft and become a wholly open project LibreCad... although in my opinion it's been spoiled a bit (or perhaps I just need to re-read the manual).
For myself, my all my vector drawing is done in the venerable TGIF - which I love - but I'm pretty sure that's Linux/UNIX-only.
 
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