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Function Generators with High Output Voltage

Thread starter #1
Hi there! I'm looking for some function generators which supply high output voltage (kV if possible). This is for a research so I only need 3 different brands. Of course they cannot be obsolote. They would be used for testing breakdown voltage and faults on components and electronic equipment.

Common signal generator's output voltage is 20 Vpp. Some supply a little more (30 Vpp for example but this voltage is not useful for what I need to do).

I only could find this one (on this forum):

http://trekinc.com/products/615A1.asp

Another option could be using a high output voltage amplifier for each function generator. Hope you can help me. I'll keep on searching anyway. Thanks!
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#2
This is for a research so I only need 3 different brands.
Why do you need three different types of generator?
JimB
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#4
function generators which supply high output voltage (kV if possible)
I only need 3 different brands.
There are "0" brands!
You can get a amplifier that goes on the output of a generator.

What frequency?
Sign wave? Square?
What voltage 1kv?

The last person to ask this question here wanted many kV and mhz and many amps. Maybe you can get Kv OR mhz OR amps but not at the same time.
 
Thread starter #5
There are "0" brands!
You can get a amplifier that goes on the output of a generator.

What frequency?
Sign wave? Square?
What voltage 1kv?

The last person to ask this question here wanted many kV and mhz and many amps. Maybe you can get Kv OR mhz OR amps but not at the same time.
What frequency? I'm not looking for an specific frequency range. If it's a wide range, better.
Sign wave? Square? Sign wave, square, triangle, sawtooth and that's enough.
What voltage 1kv? Not specified. Enough to use it as breakdown voltage.

I found this recently ( amplifier ):

http://flcelectronics.com/pdf/A800DI.pdf

But price is not showed there.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#6
I found this recently ( amplifier ):
There you go. Good find. Now you can use almost any "Common signal generator". You need 10 to 15 volts out to drive the amp.
Sign wave? Square? Sine wave, square, triangle, sawtooth
A 100khz sine wave will look like a sine/triangle wave.
speed problems:
The output can only move up/down at a maximum of 300V/uS so a square wave can turn into a triangle.
The output can not pass anything faster than 200khz so any wave can turn into a sine wave.
The output can only put 60mA so if you are driving any capacitance the output will be slow. No 50 ohm load.

This amp is a good audio amp (not driving a 8 ohm speaker) but you will not get "RF" out of it.
 
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OBW0549

Active Member
#7
I don't know that I'd trust that thing: at one point the document states, "Any function or arbitrary waveform generator with low output impedance and output voltage up to ±10 V can be used as an input device." Yet just a few paragraphs later it cautions, "The amplitude of the input signal should normally be kept within ±4 V." On the following page it again says, in bright red print, "Keep input signals within ±4 V range" and in the diagram on the page after that, the input is shown with a label saying "±4 V."

Is the ±10 V a misprint? Or the ±4 V? One or the other must be wrong. And if the maximum input is ±4 V, and the amplifier gain is 100, ±400 V is all you're going to get out of this thing.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#10
How can they state an output voltage of 1600Vpp when it clearly can't manage that? I can see that 4Vpp can become 400Vpp and 800Vpp with the phase inverter but how can 1600Vpp be achieved.
Did I miss something?

Mike.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#11
I know you asked about function generators, but you did not really give anything to go on. For measurements check out Tektronix/Keithley and Agilent SMU's (Source Measure Units) I think some can have programs downloaded to them. They are not function generators.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
#12
ac voltage references (like what you would find in a calibration lab) can source a sine wave up to 1999.99Vrms at up to 20khz (some go higher in frequency, and some only go to 1kV), but at very low current. using an amplifier and function generator are ok, to a point, because of slew rate limiting as ronsimpson pointed out. an amplifier capable of more than 300V/us is going to be very expensive. that's why AC voltage references are so expensive (well also the fact that they have very accurate control of the output amplifier).

here's the schematic for one capable of 1800Vp-p https://m.eet.com/media/1134617/15429-101404di.pdf it's the one on p110
 
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