• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Fried Component

Status
Not open for further replies.

marco sturniolo

New Member
Attached is a zip file containing some pics of a small PCB. This PCB is out of a 12V / 24V starter pack. The 12V option works whereas the 24V does not work. As you can see by the pics there is a small fried component (next to the two brown wires.) I was wondering if anybody could tell me what this component is and what it's rating is so that I may replace it and get the 24V option working again. If anybody could offer any relevant information I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.
 

Attachments

colin55

Well-Known Member
It looks like a 3 amp power diode. (But it could be a 12v zener diode.) Let us know where the wires "go to" on the switch and where the other wires (leads) go to.
Remove the burnt out component and look at the symbol on the board.
 
Last edited:

flat5

Member
I think it's a diode. You could use the 1N400x series.
1N4005, 1N4006, or 1N4007 if I'm correct.
Not sure about this because it looks like it would be across the voltage source, the red and black wires.

Here are the two best pics to show the component.
 

Attachments

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I am rather sure its a zener diode. It looks like a V1 reference below it. That is a common referance in century equipment to a voltage regulator device.

Century equipment does use simple, solid, rugged, and reliable concepts in their designs. But some place between the design concept stage and the manufacturing stage solid, reliable, and rugged get dumped in order to save a few dollars durring the manufacturing stage! :D
There is cheap crap devices and then below them is century devices! :(
 
Last edited:

Sceadwian

Banned
So go with colin's 3 amp guestimate and buy a 4-5 amp zener (cause obviously this one couldn't take it) Determining the voltage could be tricky if you don't know what voltage was on the circuit before.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Sceadwian, a 4 or 5 amp zener? Are you smoken something besides IC's?
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Must have been tcmtech, my son was bugging me a bit this afternoon for lunch when I was posting =>

colin said three amps and zener and I got carrier away =)
I'm horrible and translating PC board views into schematics, though I try =\ If it's a zener regulator though where's the resistor? I'm not sure what I'm missing here.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I am just guessing that its a zener by the V1 referance. The resistor could be external to the board and the two brown wires may go to it. Its only a guess. It could very well not be a zener too.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
could be reverse polarity protection. supposed to blow the fuse if you hook it up backwards. if you bypass the fuse, and hook it up backwards again, the diode shorts. if you keep it connected long enough to burn the diode open, you now have bigger problems. the diode used most often for reverse polarity protection is a 1N4004. the cathode stripe goes toward the positive lead.
 
Last edited:

colin55

Well-Known Member
We neeed to know the wiring to the leads and switch before we can decide anything.
It could be a zener to convert 24v to 12v, so the same circuit can be used as for the 12v detection.
 
Last edited:

forumlicker007

New Member
Well, not a diode or something cheap!

I suspect that fried part is a new technology/invention made in China. It's clearly written under the item! Haven't you guys seen it?
 

Sceadwian

Banned
<clears the tears of laughter from his eyes>
I hope that was a joke 007.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Well, not a diode or something cheap!

I suspect that fried part is a new technology/invention made in China. It's clearly written under the item! Haven't you guys seen it?
ya mean it's one of those new unobtainium arsenide superconducting diodes?:D

sorry, 01APR was last week, i should stop now.......... well, just one more..... don't forget, that was made on the other side of the International Date Line, you need a left-handed soldering iron to put the new one in..........

ok, i'll stop now..........
 

marco sturniolo

New Member
could be reverse polarity protection. supposed to blow the fuse if you hook it up backwards. if you bypass the fuse, and hook it up backwards again, the diode shorts. if you keep it connected long enough to burn the diode open, you now have bigger problems. the diode used most often for reverse polarity protection is a 1N4004. the cathode stripe goes toward the positive lead.
Thanks all for your input!
Neglected to mention that the diode was blown by mistakingly connecting newly bought batteries incorrectly.
Given this, is using a 1N4004 a safe option ?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top