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Ethernet port

charlesli

Member
If there is no wifi module, is networking possible with only one Ethernet port?

QQ图片20210803182012.jpg
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That depends how the port is configured & for what protocols!

If it supports full TCP/IP operation, then what's the difference from having a single ethernet port on a PC or any other device - it connects to an ethernet switch, either stand-alone or part of a router, then on to other devices or the internet etc.
 

charlesli

Member
That depends how the port is configured & for what protocols!

If it supports full TCP/IP operation, then what's the difference from having a single ethernet port on a PC or any other device - it connects to an ethernet switch, either stand-alone or part of a router, then on to other devices or the internet etc.
Thank you for your reply, I think you are right, they seem to have the full TCP/IP operation, and maybe they just do not open it to users.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It appears all the configuration has to be done via the "Stone designer GUI editor" program.

Does that have any options to select which port is used to connect with the host system? The datasheet shows communications via ethernet, but that may well only apply to duplicating the same comms as used via the serial port & no other functions.
 

charlesli

Member
It appears all the configuration has to be done via the "Stone designer GUI editor" program.

Does that have any options to select which port is used to connect with the host system? The datasheet shows communications via ethernet, but that may well only apply to duplicating the same comms as used via the serial port & no other functions.
I can see the location where it is connected to the host computer communication has two interfaces, one is the Ethernet port, the other is the USB port.
 

allenMark

New Member
I can see the location where it is connected to the host computer communication has two interfaces, one is the Ethernet port, the other is the USB port.
Agree with you,
We can easily connect with the internet through the USB if ethernet port you couldn't find out!
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm not really sure what the question is, but you can connect it to an access point so it can connect wireless.

Some routers, but especially repeaters have many different configurations available.

An aside:
I owned one device which would not connect via a crossover cable. It had to have a switch or hub connected.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It was in the past. The 10baseT ERA.
Gigabit Crossover cables are "not supposed to" cross pair1 and 4.
So, the most common form of a gigabit crossover cable is a half-crossed cable.


I think it was a printserver. e.g. make a USB printer attach to Ethernet.
 
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