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End of the vcr what is replacing the vcr

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mrel

Member
Hello
Since VCR are no longer been manufacture ,is there a device that replace the vcr that have event timer,composite input front and back and output.
Using memory stick or SD card to save recorded information.

mrel
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
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You're in the wrong century :p

VCR died out a VERY long time ago, and was replaced by DVD Recorders - but DVD Recorders in turn have now died out as well.

Basically there's nothing to make removable media recordings any more, recordings now are made on PVR's to an internal HDD, and generally can't be copied off as they are usually encrypted for copyright reasons.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
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I'm responsible for the death of a number of vcr's, as a result my parts drawers have more in them.
I've found the supply of vcr's pretty much dried up now, when seen they only fetch a quid or 2.
 

tcmtech

Banned
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You typed on just one of the many replacements while making this thread. :facepalm:

Basically there's nothing to make removable media recordings any more, recordings now are made on PVR's to an internal HDD, and generally can't be copied off as they are usually encrypted for copyright reasons.
I disagree. There isn't anything that isn't copyable if you are willing to get the right software or use the right sources to find it.

I download movies all the time and I have no problem copying a download to a DVD disk if needed for someone else to have. Same with buying a DVD of some movie or whatever. With the right know how they are easily copied even suposedly copyright protected or whatever else. ;)
 

ronsimpson

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Most Helpful Member
You can get a "USB" TV. Turns you computer into a TV. I don't have one, want one. lol
I got a "USB composite video input". I use it to record security video. Works with a PC or Raspberry Pi computer.

I think a USB TV and Raspberry PI could make a video recorder. The R. Pi works well with a HDMI TV.
 

audioguru

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The latest PVRs record hundreds of TV channels at the same time so that you can see any show any time later. My older PVR is set to record daily TV shows and weekly shows that I programmed it to do automatically.
My digital camera records on its tiny memory card.
 

audioguru

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Most cable TV companies give away a PVR for free when you subscribe to their hundreds of channels. The latest PVR is wireless and can be seen on every TV in the home.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
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I get 36 channels, free, off the air. No cable. Too far from town. I know people that pay $200 a month for cable with recorder.
I use a "Digital to Analog" box and a old VCR to record. Not good but works.
 

tcmtech

Banned
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Except that's hardly a general consumer item, and well beyond many (if not most) consumers.
I don't follow you reasoning. Unless the OP is at some public library or such place that thas free access to computers that can go online he already has the very device he needs to do what he wants. At worst he has to spend a few dollars to buy a USB or such video card type adapter to make his computer work as a recorder.

Or more realistically simply learn how to find whatever show he normally wanted to record online and watch it directly off his computer anytime.

As was pointed out VCR's went out of style some 30 years ago so it's very unlikely there are many people that far behind on technology as to not already have some sort of far superior system for watching whatever they want already in place and even fewer that would have no access to buy any modern day equivalent devices for next to nothing at a pawn shop or such place.
 

Nigel Goodwin

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Most Helpful Member
I don't follow you reasoning.
It's pretty simple - the majority of people couldn't use a computer as a VCR/DVD substitute, most could hardly work their VCR or DVD recorder anyway :D

While it's possible to replicate such functions with a computer it's not simple, and it's not really very practical - if nothing else on simply on power wastage grounds :D

I deal with the general public on a day to day basis, while you might be perfectly happy 'bodging' a solution using a computer the general public certainly wouldn't be.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I deal with the general public on a day to day basis, while you might be perfectly happy 'bodging' a solution using a computer the general public certainly wouldn't be.
How do you consider plugging something into a USB port and downloading the related software 'Bodging' ? :rolleyes:

USB TV tuner. $17 at Walmart.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/11060835...75035&wl11=online&wl12=11060835&wl13=&veh=sem

Or

Video to USB adapter. $9 on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/HDE-Audio-Ca...86245316&sr=8-3&keywords=usb-to-video+adapter

Or

Virtual VCR software to turn your computer into a VCR for free.

https://sourceforge.net/projects/virtualvcr/


If person can use a cellphone charger and get online with a computer they are obviously competent enough to do that being plugging things into USB ports and downloading and installing software would have been required by both to do both. :facepalm:

Especially given that to use a VCR they had to be able to properly insert and remove the cassette plus navigate the controls and buttons to set it up and program it to record what they want when they want. :rolleyes:
 
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