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encapsulating

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Ross Craney

New Member
Keep the catalyst to<1% for a slow cure else you'll end up with a chemical oven & damaged project
 

Hero999

Banned
It depends on what you want to do.

I'd recommend silicone rubber, we used to use it at work. It's good because it can easily be removed if required, yet it's heat resistant, water proof and doesn't heat much when curing.

I've never tried artist's mould making rubber but it might be good, it's certainly cheaper than other resins.
Tracy's Stained Glass Workshop - Smooth-On Silicone Mold Making Rubber, 16 oz
 

Dallas90

New Member
The stuff I'm looking at gets too hot if you make a large batch (400 grams), so I might be able to use this stuff but I would have to use a number of pourings.
 

BrownOut

Banned
Cure your substance in a very cool place. Once, I was encapsulating a product, and my boss turned off the A/C to try to save on the utilities, as the normal work day had ended. The epoxy I was using actually boiled over and made a HUGE mess! Recently, I encapsulated the back of some multiple contactor connectors by just forming a dam with tape around the connector body, the top edge of the tape protuding to the level I want to fill with epoxy. Didn't look pretty, but man it really worked!
 
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bountyhunter

Well-Known Member
I used epoxy for assemblies that went on my motorcycle to keep from shaking the parts off or shearing component leads off (guess how I found out about that). Rubber is good but doesn't provide as much mechanical support as epoxy.
 

chemelec

Well-Known Member
Before Soldering the Circuit Board, I lightly SAND It to Roughen it up and Increase Bonding Strength.

Than I use a 15 Minute Epoxy, with a little Black Color to keep out Prying Eyes and some Micro Ballons for Added Strength.

Once its Cured, Its nearly impossible to remove this coating without totally damaging the circuit.

And I haven't had any problems with overheating.
 
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Hero999

Banned
What's the point of the potting?

Is it to protect you intellectual property or is it just environmental protection or high voltage insulation?

I've never been convinced of using it to protect IP because it seems to provide an incentive to some reverse engineers who'll only use paint stripper and all manner of harsh chemicals to remove it.
 

Dallas90

New Member
I don't mind protecting the IP for now, as I'd like to license it. But the main reason is protection, it has to work in a wet environment (not submerged, but possible spray).
 

chemelec

Well-Known Member
What's the point of the potting?

Is it to protect you intellectual property or is it just environmental protection or high voltage insulation?

I've never been convinced of using it to protect IP because it seems to provide an incentive to some reverse engineers who'll only use paint stripper and all manner of harsh chemicals to remove it.

I Haven't seen Any Chemicals that will remove Epoxy.
You can Chip it away with a Dremmel Tool, But that ususally results in Damage to parts.
Especially with the Micro-Ballons in it.

And this mixture makes it Quite Protected from water.
 

Hero999

Banned
I Haven't seen Any Chemicals that will remove Epoxy.
A quick Google reveals the following:
Dimethoxyethane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dichloromethane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pyridine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think formaldehyde will also probably work on some resins.

You can also buy purpose designed chemicals for resin removal.
**broken link removed**

EDIT:
Paint/nail varnish remove should also do the job.
https://www.makingdiyeasier.co.uk/nitromors/pvremovers.html
 
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