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Eagle libraries wanted

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earckens

Member
Maybe I am just lazy but after downloading a gazillion of libraries from Eagle and Element14 I still cannot find a simple IRL520N when drawing a schematic in Eagle. Anyone a usefull set of relevant libraries? (Yes I know how to install and activate a library ;))
Thanks,
Erik
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I always recommend creating your own libraries. It keeps symbols and footprint styles consistent and it just looks better. You can usually find all the information you need to create a component in a custom library from the datasheet.

One of our very own members here, AtomSoft , made a tutorial video to show how to do this:

 

earckens

Member
Thanks for the suggestion, will do. Instruction video is excellent but requires multiple viewings befor all gets in :eek:
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Thanks for the suggestion, will do. Instruction video is excellent but requires multiple viewings befor all gets in :eek:
That's understandable, and to be expected. I find it most helpful to follow along with Eagle and the video open at the same time. For many people it is easier to learn by doing.
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Maybe I am just lazy but after downloading a gazillion of libraries from Eagle and Element14 I still cannot find a simple IRL520N when drawing a schematic in Eagle. Anyone a usefull set of relevant libraries? (Yes I know how to install and activate a library ;))
Thanks,
Erik
There are many NMOSFETs in the standard EAGLE library. For the IRL520 just use an NMOSFET with the same case and change the 'Value' (right click on the symbol in a schematic and select 'Value').

spec
 
Last edited:

earckens

Member
One thing I learned meanwhile is that for every project I make a specific project library where I store the devices used. Those are mostly/all edited copies from other libraries.

An example is an electrolytic capacitor from the stock rcl library: that contains a gazillion packages of which you only need one, and that still has to be modified; if you import the stock elco you get saddled with all those unwanted packages. So I make a new device, copy the symbol from the rcl device (and edit if I need to), and then copy the modified/self-made package from rcl to my own library. The result is the required elco, with just the package(s) needed. It took me the better part of the past several days to find out, but once you know it takes the time to modify package and symbol drawings and that is it (if you know where to look for the initial closest already-made device).

If there are other approaches or operating procedures please enlighten me, I am sure I can learn from you.
Erik
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
As I suggested before, make your own libraries. In my experience it is a MUCH better approach than using parts from various third-party libraries. You have a lot more control if you make your own.
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I always recommend creating your own libraries. It keeps symbols and footprint styles consistent and it just looks better. You can usually find all the information you need to create a component in a custom library from the datasheet.

One of our very own members here, AtomSoft , made a tutorial video to show how to do this:

I have seen a few video tutorials for creating parts and libraries in EAGLE but this one is excellent: clear and concise- even I can follow it.:cool:

spec
 
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