Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

dc power supply

Status
Not open for further replies.

doelst

New Member
Ok before everyone laughs, please bare in mind that im not in any way an electronics afficianado, but i do have a few questions that i would love for someone to please help me with. Ill just tell you what im tryign to do, and maybe just maybe someone can help. I am an artist, a sculptor in fact and i have this piece that im wokring on and i want to add some lighting inside that shows outward. I have this idea of using one of those ufo tent led lights as a donor part. Only problem is that it runs on batteries, 4 AAs to be exact and im hoping that someone could tell me how i could go about being able to get a cell phone type power supply for it, or any other advice would be greatly appreciated, Thank you for your lattitude, im sure there are eyes rolling all over the place as you read this!
 

mneary

New Member
I'm trying to dissect your paragraph. Do you want to find a plug-in power source to replace the batteries?
 

Electronworks

New Member
Hi

The battery range of 4AA cells is 3.6V to about 6.6V, so you will need a regulated 5V power supply. Beware, you can get unregulated and regulated ones. The unregulated ones only give out the correct voltage under a certain load. Regulated ones are a bit more expensive, but will give out 5V within the load regs of the power supply. The best ones to get are called Wall Cubes and are those ones with a big brick like thing on the power socket.

Current rating....? You need to pick one with a current rating high enough to power your LEDs. If the light is designed to run off 4AA batteries, I cannot see the current being that high. 100mA or higher should do the trick.

You can buy the mating connector from most components shops (RS and Farnell) and a they are called 2.5mm dc power jack sockets

Connect the negative to the springy end of your battery connector and th positive end to the nipple like thing.

Hope this helps
 

doelst

New Member
Thank you

just wanted to say thank you for your replies. I never imagained that i would get anything back. I was so helped by the info, and i have it sorted out.... Ill be sure to post a link to a picture of what im working on when im done, Thanks a million!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
 

mneary

New Member
I should add a detail on the power jack sockets. In the US, they are commonly called "coaxial power connectors". The outer diameter is 5.5mm; the inner diameter is usually 2.5mm. In my experience, the center pin for the 2.5mm type has always been positive (+). Check both the power ssupply and jack before ordering.

The second most popular inside diameter is 2.1mm. They aren't as common, so I would avoid them. I have seen some center negative (-) in the 2.1mm size (about 5% of what I've seen) which makes me shy of 2.1mm.

There are other sizes, too. I have a "universal" adapter kit which has nine different adapters. If you can, try to get 5.5mm outside, 2.5mm inside, center (+): you can't go wrong.

If you get a 5V regulated cell-phone charger (very popular and very cheap), its connection might be USB or mini-USB. Attaching most of these is usually straightforward, but some of them need a resistor so that they "know" they should turn on. Don't worry about that unless you encounter it. Instructions are on the net if you need them.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top