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DC Driven Motor and Rotating Arm

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MaxTMon

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I'm looking to build a setup that will rotate a rod or arm as it holds an item for drying. A Google search using the terms "fishing rod dryer" will give a basic idea of what I'm needing, but the project is not for fishing rods or lures. The setup would require a low torque motor with a speed controller that turns relatively slow. the speed would be no faster than a turntable for displaying items. I have a rough up built of the frame; other hardware needed would be a motor assembly, gearing, battery pack, and on/off switch.

The intent of this project is shown in the YouTube video link.


Research will show several other options, most builds are for multiple cup holders. I'd rather have an individual stand, that is sturdy (heavy base to counter the rotation and weight of the cups), and economical. They use a BBQ rotisserie but the price runs from 40$ and up.

Attached are the photos of my mock up and a limited sketch.

As for the motor, I'd think a battery powered would be best as no cords in the way. Size and torque still to be determined but enough to turn a stainless mug (ie Yeti, RTIC, Ozark) for up to 24 hours non stop. This also requires the battery consumption be figured. I'd like to have a speed control knob for up to 10 RPM. The purpose is to keep the mug rotating as an epoxy coat dries. The rotation keeps the coat uniform and smooth until it dries.

Sources for the motor could range from old CD/DVD drives, phonographs, microwave turntables, or EBay finds. The overall intent is to have as few components/hardware in the build. Its possible that some of the parts could be built into the base of the stand, ie battery pack.

I don't mind any suggestions to improve the plans. In fact once the basic plans are made, I'd like to add an Arduino with features of a built in timer, humidity, and temp.

Thanks for any assistance
 

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large_ghostman

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Depends what you want to spend but, arduino kits have the controller and a stepper motor in with driver board ~£20. You could get the bits separately at around £12. The stepper and driver will handle this easy. You could go from less than 1 rev per hour to over 500 rev per min. Let me no if you need details, the code for Arduino with the stepper motor is all over the net.
 

MaxTMon

New Member
Thank you for your reply. I was thinking that I would like to just get the basics of the project established first. The ability to turn the item. However, it dawned on me from your comment, that I probably have 95% of the hardware already on hand to do this project. I have two Arduino project kits with the sensors, motors, wiring, and plenty of Arduino boards. I'm just not sure where to go from here to sketch this out and get the codeing.
 

large_ghostman

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Thank you for your reply. I was thinking that I would like to just get the basics of the project established first. The ability to turn the item. However, it dawned on me from your comment, that I probably have 95% of the hardware already on hand to do this project. I have two Arduino project kits with the sensors, motors, wiring, and plenty of Arduino boards. I'm just not sure where to go from here to sketch this out and get the codeing.
The stepper motor your likely to have in the kit should do, the driver board is also good. The code you just google and you will be swamped! Or goto spark fun site, they have various motor kits that are cheap and code as well.

I dont draw very well so mainly i use mind pics :D.
 

large_ghostman

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If it was me, I would use a cheap (£2) paint roller and attach the motor to one end of that, I wouldnt spend $40 on it. But I am cheap :D...........

Or even more simple is a centre wooden dowel and a tube slipped over it, then the foam. Not explained that well, I will dry and mock something up later, trying to save my fictional bankrupt company!! I made a huge mistake in my exam project by not pricing the main manufacturing component :D. :D:D

Dosnt look like I will be self employed when I leave school lol
 

MikeMl

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MaxTMon

New Member
That is the main motor that other builders use, however, finding those used is not easy. I was looking to design it using a smaller motor. Priced new, they are about 60$+. I did hit the thrift shops and found a few used appliances. The best find was an old cassette deck. It has a lot of gears, rubber belts and turns slow by design. I can't figure out the motor that I pulled out of it.
 

MaxTMon

New Member
If it was me, I would use a cheap (£2) paint roller and attach the motor to one end of that, I wouldnt spend $40 on it. But I am cheap :D...........

Or even more simple is a centre wooden dowel and a tube slipped over it, then the foam. Not explained that well, I will dry and mock something up later, trying to save my fictional bankrupt company!! I made a huge mistake in my exam project by not pricing the main manufacturing component :D. :D:D

Dosnt look like I will be self employed when I leave school lol
I like the idea of a paint roller, I'll grab one from my shed and see how to maybe incorporate it into the design.
 

large_ghostman

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Bah I bet you make millions from that roller now :(, why do I give all my best ideas away :p:p let us know how it goes. You can call from your private jet :D
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I imagine a microwave turntable motor would be perfect - nice and slow, and easily available for free - in fact I've just put an old microwave in the back of the car to take and dump tomorrow.
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you have automotive connections a wiper motor might do the trick, the speed is about right, and they have a 2 speed winding, the bearings will hold a reasonable weight and you could probably run one of less than 12v.
 
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