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DC DC Converter

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JimB

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That module seems to be an effective solution, what equipment are you running from the 12v supply?

To improve imunity to spikes, I would add a small inductor to the 24v input line, the inductor in conjunction with the capacitors on the input circuit of the module will go a long way to damping any spikes.
You could also add a 30 or 35v zener diode to clip the spikes.

Less reliable than a series regulator?
From a purely statistical point of view, it is more complex and so it will be more prone to failure.
From a practical point of view you would probably never notice the difference unless you built a lot of each type and used them in the vehicles to test them.

JimB
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
1. Yes. Add transient suppressor diodes (Tranzorbs) to the input, and a power diode from the output to the input (anode to the input).

2. What you have *is* a series regulator. If you meant more reliable than a linear regulator, then I don't think the switcher design is inherently less reliable. Switching regulator circuits have more parts and more solder connections,. but generate less heat. It is not a simple or easy comparison to make, and depends on the specific design and manufacturing details of both approaches.

ak
 

Ian Rogers

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Remember that a vehicle power has noise on both ground and positive.. The only way to have less noise on the ground ( vehicle chassis ) is to keep the negative wire as short as possible and to the nearest earthing point..

Behind the dash is the noisiest place ( electrically ) than anywhere.....
 

dr pepper

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The lm2000 series are fairly robust, there doesnt look to be any protection or filtering on that board so a tranzorb or mov would be a good addition.
I put together a circuit that did this, but it was much more rough and ready, I wanted to run a 28v 250w spotlight off 12v, the circuit worked however the bulb ran directly off high frequency ac from the o/p of the transformer.

P.S. I assume the sensor runs at a lower voltage than 12v, if so why step up to 24 then back down again, how about making a power supply regulator than can operate from 12v up to 24v.
 
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crutschow

Well-Known Member
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I would assume the power required by this device is relatively small so why not just use a 12V low-dropout linear regulator that works from a 24V to 12V input?
 
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