Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

DC/DC converter

Status
Not open for further replies.

jrz126

Active Member
In my search through the 'junk' room at work, I came across a pile (they were really on a shelf in a pile :lol: ) of DC/DC converters. there were 3 different models, PS-4387,ps-4388, and ps-4386. I posted about getting a datasheet for these in the datasheet section too.

They are made by STEVENS ARNOLD INC. it also has "ISO-PAK DC/DC converter powersupply" written on it.

I took the PS-4388 to school with me and hooked it up to a powersupply, it appears to be a 15V regulator. From the size of it (about 3"x3") I would figure that it could step the voltage up to 15V as well, but it just brings the voltage down. It only has 4 pins, 2 for +/- in and the other 2 for +/- out.

I went back and "borrowed" one of the PS-4387's. This one has 8 pins, 4 for the DC IN and DC OUT. it also has a control pin (located on the same side as the DC IN) and the other 3 pins are S+, trim, and S-.
How would I go about using this? and is this model adjustable?
 

Phasor

Member
DC IN and DC OUT are self-explanatory. You probably figured them out already.

The S+ and S- pins are probably 'sense' pins, used for remote voltage sensing. This is to compensate for line drop between the regulator and the load (so that you get 15V at the load, instead of at the regulator terminals). In order to utilise this function, you need to run seperate voltage leads between the sense pins and the load terminals. Only needs to be small wire, doesn't carry much current. Normally, if this function is not needed, the sense pins are looped to the output pins at the regulator (S+ to +ve output, S- to -ve output).

I'd say the 'trim' pin is for minor voltage adjustment, though I can't say exactly how you would connect it. I would also hazard a guess that the control pin is for a on/off function, though I would expect it to be on the output side, not the input side.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I am not familiar with this particular converter, but usually the "trim" pin is used to adjust the output voltage.
This is usually done by means of a resistor connected to one of the output pins. The change in output voltage is dependant on the resistor value, the lower the resistor value, the greater the change in output voltage.
If you feel like experimenting, connecte a 10 or 20K "pot" across the output terminals, connect the slider to the trim terminal, set the pot to mid position, switch on and see how the output voltage varies as the pot turns.
CAUTION, until you see how the output voltage varies, it may be a good idea not to swing the pot to the end stops. (Or put 4k7 resistors between the ends of the pot and the output terminals to limit the swing).

JimB
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

New Articles From Engineer's Garage

Top