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damaged chips

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digital

New Member
When I was little I use to bang a t.v remote, now its not working :( Is it possible to fix it ?

Can chips be damaged by collisions, like falling to the floor ?

What about other components like zener diodes and transistors ?
 

Someone Electro

New Member
No you can throw chips in the wall and thay will still work.

Its most probobly a lose conectin.Or it may be one of those universal remotes that need to be set for certan TVs
 

zevon8

New Member
Number one fatality for remote controls is the ceramic resonator that is used to produce the 38khz carrier frequency. Cheap to replace. Often they are placed on the PCB in such a way that if the remote is dropped the resontaor will "slap" into the PCB, destroying the resontor. When I replaced them, I always glued them down.

As Someone Electro said, check for broken solder joints also, especially the IR LED.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Another common problem is dry joints on the 'large' decoupling capacitor, and as already said, dry joints on the IR LED, and broken ceramic resonators. Incidently, while the IR modulation is about 38KHz, it's derived from a ceramic resonator about 455KHz.
 

digital

New Member
what exactly is a ceramic resonator and how does it work ?
whats a decoupling capacitor ?

on my remote the ceramic resonator has two pins and has this written on it:
b455
e 20
m U
what does this mean ?

What if I throw a pentium againt the floor, will it still work properly !
 

Agent 009

New Member
I think, other than loose connections, u could have broken components, not just the resonator, but anything else: maybe the chip it another stuff when it disconnected from the PCB...
 

Someone Electro

New Member
The thing you are talking about is proboby a transistor.

Its a boxy yellow plastic or metal rounded thingy that has 2 (a crystal) or 3 (a resonator) pins.

If you throw an pentium in the flor you will break its fragile pins.If you throw an DIP chip in the flor you will only bend its pins (you can bend them back)

Check for lose conections.You may want to take it to someone who knows electronics stuff and has the tools.
 

zevon8

New Member
The part with the number 455 on it is a ceramic resonator, 455 Khz. You can get one from another remote, or even some AM portable radios, to test if it is OK.
 

mstechca

New Member
digital said:
When I was little I use to bang a t.v remote, now its not working :( Is it possible to fix it ?
Open it up and look for problems. If something seems scratched, replace or fix it.


Can chips be damaged by collisions, like falling to the floor ?
Water and certain chemicals can damage chips. Water conducts electricity.

What about other components like zener diodes and transistors ?
They can be damaged too.

But if something just "falls on the floor", then it should still work. If it fell in a pool of liquid, then you may be in trouble.
 

Someone Electro

New Member
If you dunk it in water whithout the batery it shod work.You wod just have to dry it out before puting in the batery.

One guy here put an cell phone in water for 24 houres and and then he picked it out put the batery in and it still worked.
 

digital

New Member
Is there any conventional way to check the ceramic resonator, such as using a multimeter, how would a pro check it ?

Whats the difference between a quartz crystal(used in watches) and a ceramic resonator ?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
digital said:
Is there any conventional way to check the ceramic resonator, such as using a multimeter, how would a pro check it ?
He, or she, would place it in an oscillator circuit and measure it's output, you can't check them on a multi-meter.

Whats the difference between a quartz crystal(used in watches) and a ceramic resonator ?
Basically the material they are made from!, a ceramic resonator uses ceramic, and a crystal uses a slice of quartz - quartz is a GREAT deal better than ceramic, it's far more stable and accurate - so if accuracy is required you would use a crystal. If accuracy isn't too important, a cheaper ceramic resonator would be sufficient - most micro-controller project would be perfectly OK with a ceramic resonator!.
 
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