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Computer Speakers case opening

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paradigm

New Member
Hello,
Although they are now several years old, and no longer available, I have found the Diamond Pro Media 2010 Computer Speakers (external) to be excellent. These can be seen at:
http://technoyard.com/2000/07/06/diamond-audio-pro-media-speaker-systems/4/

However, I need to replace the audio cable on the main (amplifier) unit due to some accidental damage. But I cannot see how to open the case without marking/damaging the plastic - there seem to be no screws under feet or labels, etc. The mesh/grille is solid and does not seem to be removable. There is a seam in the casing separating front front from back - but how to open? I cannot find any service information - the old Diamond Audio company no longer exists (although the name was sold - but they cannot help).
I would be grateful if anyone has the answer to this question? Thank you for your assistance.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
From my experience in opening several pairs, all of different brands: no screw was covered by any label.

The ones to start with, were in the rear, deep well inside cylindric recesses. Always Philips screws. Additional ones visible after removing the black grid with a simple careful manipulation.
 

paradigm

New Member
Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately, there are definitely no visible screws in this unit - there is a sound opening/port in the rear but still no screws are visible through this. As said, the mesh/grille seems to be very firmly in place and may even have been pressed in from the inside. Might it be possible that the case halves are plastic spot-welded together (using ultrasonics)? It would be a pity to damage the plastic or the grille through not knowing the method of assembly. Can anyone suggest where best to look for service information? - there is a very similar model to the DPM-2010, the DPM-2012. The problem in opening these cases seems strange since things like the volume control may need servicing from time to time. Thanks to everyone.
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately, there are definitely no visible screws in this unit - there is a sound opening/port in the rear but still no screws are visible through this. As said, the mesh/grille seems to be very firmly in place and may even have been pressed in from the inside. Might it be possible that the case halves are plastic spot-welded together (using ultrasonics)? It would be a pity to damage the plastic or the grille through not knowing the method of assembly. Can anyone suggest where best to look for service information? - there is a very similar model to the DPM-2010, the DPM-2012. The problem in opening these cases seems strange since things like the volume control may need servicing from time to time. Thanks to everyone.
It is quite possible that your speakers are sealed, although normally with glue rather tha ultrasonic heating.

Some items, especially for PCs, are disposable and 'cannot' be serviced- mains power supply adapters for example.

Any screws are liable to be behind the speaker grill, which is also likely to be glued in position.

It is highly unlikely that service information will be available- I have repaired/modified similar speakers in the past and have never been able to get any servicing data, but the circuits are so simple that you do not really need a service manual.

The only option is to prise off the speaker grill and do the minimum damage, but even so you may not find any screws.

If so, the next move would be to either leaver the halves of the case apart with a cold sharp knife or failing that a hot sharp knife- I have used both techniques, but mainly on PC mains power supply units.

spec
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
I forgot what is usual to ask for in this cases: pictures. Could you show both sides including the grille's edge and bottom of the case?

I recall opening completely one of them using a cutter (exacto something?).
 

SamuelBear91

New Member
A closer picture of the speaker would be great to have a clear view. I encountered this kind of difficulty before, there are points/areas to press in order lose the latches inside the casing. I am not sure if it will be the same case for this kind of speaker.
 

paradigm

New Member
Thanks to all who have replied. Although it is on my shopping list, I unfortunately don't presently have a macro-capable camera to take decent close-ups! I had hoped the pictures on the web-link I gave might have triggered someone's memory of a past repair. Nevertheless I will try to provide some photographs as requested. In the meantime, the base of the speakers is completely plain and flat with only two stick-on feet at the front corners and a label in the centre - no screws to be seen. The rear is curved with an elongated sound port half-way up and there are three sockets and a cable entry grommet (audio and power) at the foot - again no screws to be seen anywhere. The grille is a robust metallic mesh manufactured from an array of small holes (~1mm dia) - there is very little projection of the grille above the plastic casing surround and it is not obvious whether the grille is pressed in from the front or the rear. There is no screw under the badge on the grille and no screws visible when shining a light through the grille. The plastic cases have quite a solid and strong feel without much flex. It may indeed be that these speakers are sealed and are never intended to be opened. My regards to all.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
As others have said, it's quite common for cheap speakers to be glued together and non-serviceable (including home audio speakers, as well as computer ones).
 

paradigm

New Member
For added information, please now find some images of the main speaker unit as requested:

Front, Back, Side, Base and Grille-edge.

Thanks to all.

Back_view-min.jpg Base_view-min.jpg Front_view-min.jpg Grille-Edge-min.jpg Side_view-min.jpg
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Remove the feet. Perhaps each hole has a plastic tang inside? Pressure on that could release a catch enabling the front panel/grille to be hinged away from the rest.
 

paradigm

New Member
Thanks for the suggestion alec_t. Unfortunately there are no holes or screws, etc. under the feet or labels. Also, the casing is remarkably rigid which would make it difficult to release internal clips by bending.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The 4th picture appears to show some difference to the surface, right where the front cover would be expected to mate in the slot.
As already suggested, this could indicate that the casing is ultrasonically welded.
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The speakers you show look similar to the speakers I have messed with. In which case, you need to prise off the speaker grills to reveal, either two or four screws.

Then you can remove the screws and separate the two halves of the speaker cabinet.

If you use plastic tools/are very careful you can normally prize off the speaker grills without deforming them too much, but you often damage the finish. Rather than trying to match the finish, it is best to simply spray the entire speaker grill. The beauty of this approach is that you can have a custom color. Paint spray cans cost £1 UK in our local Poundland store, and spraying a pair of speaker grills takes ten minutes.:)

Of course, there is the possibility that the two halves of the case have been glued.:arghh:

spec
 
Last edited:

GromTag

Active Member
Depending on how they are sealed the face grills on some I've meddled with with some strange names that have been forgotten. The facade grill can be flange tabbed into the face then bent then glued, then over all piece housing assembly sealed.

Or as noted the face is thermally sealed.

I used to run a small yet strong wire through the holes by bending the wire into a hook shape then feeding it through the grill holes at corners on each end then twisting the wire at length at each apex (strength points), gently tugging the wire to see if the face would lift any on the base sealed ones, before knowing that some were frequency sealed in some cases.

If you want to attempt removal of the face screen that is.

As for any chance of heating the whole part, the speaker and some internals will not survive that any where near the housing getting hot enough to budge. Sonic welding is a close to pinpoint area welding method.
 

paradigm

New Member
Thanks to all - perhaps these speakers are sealed and I need to look for alternatives. Great observation by Mickster - the surface marking is much more evident in the photograph than in reality and may indeed be the sign of ultrasonic welding.

I must say that as a newcomer to this forum I have been totally impressed by the level of assistance. I am a long experienced electronic engineer and have applied PICs (all Series) over many years. I look forward to maybe contributing to some threads in the future.

atferrari, if you are the same person, I remember you well from the Microchip Forums many years ago! (I posted under a different user name at that time).

Regards to all.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Thanks to all - perhaps these speakers are sealed and I need to look for alternatives. Great observation by Mickster - the surface marking is much more evident in the photograph than in reality and may indeed be the sign of ultrasonic welding.

I must say that as a newcomer to this forum I have been totally impressed by the level of assistance. I am a long experienced electronic engineer and have applied PICs (all Series) over many years. I look forward to maybe contributing to some threads in the future.

atferrari, if you are the same person, I remember you well from the Microchip Forums many years ago! (I posted under a different user name at that time).

Regards to all.
Hola

Yes, that one. Entering there from time to time nowadays. May I know what was your nick there? Nothing like Olin... I guess.:)
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you are willing to give it a go, recognizing that the case may split in the wrong place, you could wrap a cloth around the speaker case and squeeze/flex it in a vise.
This may allow you to get an initial point where the seam weld splits and you can work it along it's length.
Try all approaches - corner to corner, the longest sides, shortest, etc. you get the idea.
It's not working anyway, so what's to lose?
 
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