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computer Christmas lights

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
years ago I assembled a Compurterized Christmas light display but since sold the entire setup.
I recall the SSR or triac boards used an opti-isolator, couple resistors but instead of using a computer, I want to just use a PIC to drive the opti_isolator. Just started looking for leftover plans and parts but figure would ask first.
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
here is the schematic and screenshot of PCB revisions
 

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    revisions.png
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  • Screenshot (19).png
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For The Popcorn

Active Member
42 is the answer ti the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything, but posting the same schematic that nobody can make sense of 42 times still doesn't make it clear.

Would it be possible for you to draw an accurate schematic in the conventional and customary way with lines showing connections of the "LED matrix" showing the micro, the LEDs and their series resistors and whatever and everything that is connected to B1?

Can you turn on and off individually each of the LEDs?

You have at least one of the following (I suspect all three):

● Hardware problem

● A logic problem

● A software problem

Without an understable schematic showing the parts involved and testing to see if you can ACTUALLY control EACH and EVERY LED (show your code), this thread could go on 11 more pages and it still wouldn't work.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
here is the schematic and screenshot of PCB revisions
Your PCB shows 5V connected directly to pin 22...

The switch goes to pullup resistor R10. That's all. The other end of R10 (labelled +5V) goes through to pin 22.

Doesn't the PCB package verify the tracking to the schematic?? If not, you need a better package. EasyEDA definitely verifies connections.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Although I find MrDEBs schematics very difficult to follow, switch 1 seems to be correct. Pin is held high by R10 (assuming "5 volts in" is the 5V net) and pulled low by the switch. Or, (and it's very likely) did I miss something?

Mike.
 

For The Popcorn

Active Member
I don't think he's verified that the LEDs turn on/off by whatever means he's using, and the logic in the code is really not discernable. The switch isn't controlling a single LED on/off (which is a good test of switch function) but instead does something else entirely.
 
Last edited:

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
My mistake! one big mistake!
AFTER I posted #202, did the dishes, cleaned the kitchen before my wife woke up then started watching tv and rethinking WHY my circuit doesn't work correctly.
I looked at the screenshot of the PCB I realized I have the 5volts and the ground connections backward.
Will correct it in the morning and hopefully, all will work correctly.
 

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