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Clarification on Magnetic Transformer

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I want to understand about the magnetic transformer. Whatever the sine wave or excitation signal is applied on the primary winding will it all be applied on the secondary winding. If in the primary if i apply Esin(wt) the output on the secondary will be also Esin(wt). Assuming the turns ratio is 1:1. If i position the secondary at some angle say 90degrees with respect to stator will there be any difference? Do we have any simulation software where i can test all these cases?
 

alec_t

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Welcome to ETO!
Providing the transformer core doesn't saturate, the secondary waveform should resemble the primary waveform. The secondary voltage will depend on the turns ratio, any transformer losses, and on the magnetic coupling between the primary and secondary. Varying the relative orientation of the primary and secondary is likely to have a major effect on the magnetic coupling.
 

MikeMl

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Running sim:

trany.png
 

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kubeek

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... If i position the secondary at some angle say 90degrees with respect to stator will there be any difference? Do we have any simulation software where i can test all these cases?
What do you mean by that? There is no stator in a transformer, and there is no 90°. Are we really talking about a transformer (core with two coils around it) or something entirely different?
 

alec_t

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kubeek

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Is it possible for you to show me how the calculations are done, i don't know much about this topic, or any reference document.
You should start answering the questions and explaining in much greater detail what exactly you want to know. There is still a lot of confusion in the replies and without knowing what you actually want it is really hard to give you an answer that does not confuse things even more.
 

ronsimpson

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Right hand: If current is flowing (I) the direction of your thumb (in a wire) then flux flows like your fingers around the wire. [some one will say that current is negative so it flows down, does not matter right now, current is flowing down the wire and flux is going around the wire.]
upload_2017-7-4_15-52-49.png
The reverse of this is true. If you can make a field flow around the wire then current will move down the wire.
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Coil 1 has current. It causes flux to flow left to right.
Coil 2 has flux going by which causes current in the wire.
upload_2017-7-4_15-59-57.jpeg
If coil 2 is turned slightly so the flux is not running down the center the effect will be less. We know 90 degrees=0 current. 0 degrees=most current.
Use vector math.
 
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