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Checking High Voltage Zener and required datasheet for T3D98

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spdy

New Member
I am trying to repair a Panasonic plasma 42 inch TV TH-P42C10D. one of the suspicious components is a Zener T3D98 which is showing infinite resistance on both sides using a
diode check with a multimeter.
I cannot find any data on this. I presume this is a high voltage 100, 150 or 200 volts zener in the power supply after the bridge rectifier and parallel to the transformer input.
How can I get data on this and can it be checked with a DMM?
Thanks.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
As always, many manufacturers use 'in house' numbers on their components, so the number may well be totally meaningless.

You also may not be able to check such a device on a multimeter, and it would be extremely unusual for a high voltage zener to go O/C - if they fail it would almost certainly be S/C.

As far as I'm aware repairs on Panasonic Plasma sets were 'board only', with no individual spares available, and often no circuits either?.
 

spdy

New Member
Nigel,
Many thanks for your quick response. A service manual is available on https://elektrotanya.com/panasonic_..._th-p42c10t_chassis_gph12da.pdf/download.html
You are right, Panasonic like most other manufacturers, now prefer board only repair. The service manual unfortunately says only that it is a Zener diode,
so that is why I am looking for a data sheet, or at least find out its rated voltage. Incidentally this is a 220 volt model.
With best wishes.
spdy
 

spdy

New Member
Thanks, I just found out it is a diode with a zener both connected at anodes so will show open in both directions with a dmm.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
High voltage zeners are also often a number of lower voltage ones in series, so a DMM probably won't provide enough voltage to overcome the junction voltage.
 
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