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change of pressure or volume when a diatomic gas is ionized?

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #1
i'm usually pretty good at physics, but i am having difficulty finding an answer to this question:
when a diatomic gas (He2 for instance) is ionized in a fixed size container, does the pressure double (or more due to free electrons) from the dissociation to a monatomic plasma?
or... in a container with flexible walls, does it double it's volume?

it's logical that this would happen, but i can't seem to find any experimental or theoretical information about this.
 

Ratchit

Well-Known Member
#2
i'm usually pretty good at physics, but i am having difficulty finding an answer to this question:
when a diatomic gas (He2 for instance) is ionized in a fixed size container, does the pressure double (or more due to free electrons) from the dissociation to a monatomic plasma?
or... in a container with flexible walls, does it double it's volume?

it's logical that this would happen, but i can't seem to find any experimental or theoretical information about this.
i'm usually pretty good at physics, but i am having difficulty finding an answer to this question:
when a diatomic gas (He2 for instance) is ionized in a fixed size container, does the pressure double (or more due to free electrons) from the dissociation to a monatomic plasma?
or... in a container with flexible walls, does it double it's volume?

it's logical that this would happen, but i can't seem to find any experimental or theoretical information about this.
Helium is not a diatomic gas at STP. It has a valance of zero. If it could be ionized, what difference would the mass of an extra electron or two added or subtracted to/from the mass of 2 protons plus 2 neutrons have? I would say the pressure change would be negligible.

Ratch
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #3
Helium is not a diatomic gas at STP. It has a valance of zero. If it could be ionized, what difference would the mass of an extra electron or two added or subtracted to/from the mass of 2 protons plus 2 neutrons have? I would say the pressure change would be negligible.

Ratch
yeah, you're right, helium doesn't have any open valence. maybe nitrogen or hydrogen would be a better choice.
 

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