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AVR vs PIC MicroControllers

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I started to become interested in MicroControllers and have been reading about them. I noticed the two main architectures used are the AVR's and PIC's. I wanted to know what suggestions people might have as to witch one would be better to start off with? I know C programming and a little ASM. Does this just come down to personal preference?
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you choose PIC then you will get more help here. If you choose AVR then you will get more help at AVRfreaks.net.

Mike.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Which is better AVR or PIC. Which is better Left or Right, Liberal or Conservative. Cake or Pie. It depends on who you talk to.

If you find someone to help you with a certain micro then choose that micro!

The AVR executes an instruction on 1 clock while the PIC needs 4. Don’t compare clock speed.

There is no clear winner, AVR or PIC, but every one has an opinion.
 

Speakerguy

Active Member
PIC has larger market share. I run into it more in the industry. So I use PIC. But right now, I am learning 8051 and MSP430.
 
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Thank you for the replies, I figured I'll work on learning about PIC and maybe expand my knowledge later to other architectures later on. I'm currently looking for a layout for a PIC programmer that is USB not serial/parallel port based since my computers no longer have those ports. From what I have read its not the hardware but the software that defines what PIC models you can program am I correct with that idea?

Thank you,
Kyle
 
Thanks for the tips I have been learning toward PIC's so I think I will just take the plunge. As I was looking at the PICkit2 and wanted to know do you have to design the circuit to have the 6 pins if you want to program it by ICSP? I am still trying to figure out the "physical" side of programming PIC's.

Kyle
 

Wp100

Well-Known Member
Hi,

If you download the Pickit2 user manual it details all the connection aspects.
http://www.electro-tech-online.com/custompdfs/2009/07/51553E-1.pdf

All the other Microchip stuff is free to download such as the MPlab IDE, which includes Assembler, most of their C compiers are free as well.

The ready built PK2 is the best - but you can build you own - see similar recent threads in this forum for details of clones, kits and self builds.
 

AtomSoft

Well-Known Member
heh i beat you by less than a minute:
i added this :
"Instead of resistors for PGD and PGC (programing data,clock) you can use a 2 dip switch to isolate the circuit so programing is smoother."

after you posted that.
 
What about the PICkit3? Would there be any reason why it wouldn't matter in the long run to get that programmer instead of the PICkit2?

Thank you,
 
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