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automotive alternator regulator replacement

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kinarfi

Well-Known Member
Here a link to another forum with what I'm up to.https://www.utvboard.com/topic/2555-alternator-dead/page__view__findpost__p__13512
The alternator does NOT seem to have a replacement in the States and I thought it might be fun to build a controller for output voltages. It might even be possible to put a switch in to have the alternator put out 110v dc so you could use it to do something like brew coffee or something else, as long as you don't need more than 7.5 amps, the alternator is rated at 14 v and 75 amps.
I have only worked on this mentally, but I think a PWM method is one way to go or there is the constant dc input method. Anyone have any suggestions of how or where to look for ideas?
Thanks,
kinarfi
 

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I don't know if the diodes would be rated to 110 V.

The resistive heating depends on the current, so increasing the voltage won't reduce the current that you can take. You probably won't get 110 V unless the revs are quite high.
 

kinarfi

Well-Known Member
That's what the guy at the alternator place said too, that I wouldn't get the voltage, If I could get the higher voltage, it would have to be used on a coffee pot that did NOT have clock or anything that used ac.

So far, I'm planning on using a CS3351YDR14G IC and imbedding it in the old regulator housing. Put more photos on web shots.
kinarfi
 

debe

Active Member
This is a circuit ive used & works well. Be interested to see how you go with the chips you got.
 

kinarfi

Well-Known Member
Thanks,debe, I didn't think anything attached, but it showed up while I was typing, did you get to see the spec sheet on the CM3351? Would you like me to attach it?
Kinarfi
 

debe

Active Member
Yes Ive printed of the spec sheets, thats why im interested in how you get on with it. Had a similar altenator of a Landcruiser here with a faulty REG. Just replaced it with a second hand altenator from the wreckers.
 

kinarfi

Well-Known Member
here's another chip, looks better, no extra components, STMicroelectronics L9911, Digikey has them for ~$11.00 USD
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
So are you looking for an alternator or just a regulator?

I did a quick search for " Trooper alternator ( https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_tr...c=1&_sop=15&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14.l1513&_pgn=2 )" on eBay and came up with 17 pages of related items of every brand size, part, and price possible! :D

Brushes, regulators, bearings, stators, rotors, plugs and sockets, and so on.

As far as converting one to put out 110 volts DC or more many can but they may need to run at the higher RPM range to do it. The simplest method is to just feed a constant 12 -14 volts to the rotor and just spin it up and see if it can get to your voltage or higher and if so then put a load on it and see how much it can handle and still maintain that voltage.

The other method is to tap directly into the alternators stator coils and run the AC output through transformers and step it up to what ever voltage you need.

Just a thought! ;)
 
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kinarfi

Well-Known Member
Turned out to be a very interesting project, I think I'm done, but may need one more resistor. the B+ input from the key may need a resistor so the alternator can't back feed the run side of the key switch and keep things running when you turn the key off, I am not using the indicator light, it is powered by the computer, not use the field monitor output either, couldn't see an easy way to bring it out and what use to be the field monitor ended up getting grounded because it is tied to field-.
I did notice that the L input does not have to have a lamp in series and that any series resistance up to about 5K was OK, I did see a reference to a 50 resistance which I figure was minimum in line resistance, and that as long as the voltage is applied to L the field receives a 325 Hz square wave of around 25% on, That's a guess, then when you start spinning the rotor, the regulator starts regulating and you don't need the voltage applied to L any more.
Ended up using the L9911k chip, seems to be the way to go.
https://www.utvboard.com/topic/2555-a...post__p__13512
https://www.utvboard.com/topic/2577-alternator-regulator-replacement/page__view__findpost__p__13642
Kinarfi
 
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kinarfi

Well-Known Member
Final picture of it, ready to send back to it's owner. That's a 1000 ohm 5 watt resistor and the only reason for it being 5 watt is for strength and size of it's leads. It hooks to the ignition.
Kinarfi
 

shokjok

Member
If you want 110VDC from an alternator, you may want to try a tripler or quadrupler diode+capacitor unit, like those found in CRT televisions. You would need diodes rated at a higher current than needed, even if paired together and heatsinked. It would be a bulky unit under the hood.
As for a high current regulator, if you can modify a regulator schematic or PCB then you will be on your way to your intended goal.
 

shokjok

Member
Debe, R1 & R2 can be replaced with a 1K resistor. The schematic closely resembles the Ford stand-alone voltage regulator schematic. I have several Ford stand-alone regulators that I fixed, replacing the output transistor with a TIP125. Can't say the same for their Duraspark ignition modules. Once the Beryllium oxide coating is removed, there's not much left of the PCB.
 
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