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ARM Cortex M 3 based dev boards

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Wp100

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Pics and AVR Arduino have been the mainstay of hobbyists for many years, but now there are many Arm Cortex M4 chip based boards with inbuilt programmer for less than a tenner; probably the STM32 series boards being the most popular.

ARM chips are said to be the micro of the moment and the near future, however looking at demos of their IDE its a world away from the humble Ardunio IDE and Mplab.

The thought of getting up to speed on such modern ides / chipsets looks daunting .

While you can see many posts about such ARM based boards and many basic functions examples, you do not see many web based full projects like Arduino /Pics.

I can see the need for learning them as an academic exercise or for proper commerical use but is there any real case for the hobbyist to be using them ?


( I did try and help a friend who bought a STM32 Nucleo board who was struggling to set up its ide /mbed and have to say I found it just a perplexing as he did and why he settled back to AVR Arduino; any suggestions on an easier way to get going with those boards ? )
 
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large_ghostman

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large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Look on ARM site for stuff for the ST board. ST also has the ARM uni program. Loads of info there I will see what I can find.
 

DirtyLude

Well-Known Member
ARM Cortex M has the disadvantage of having too many options which really muddy's the field for hobbyist's with too much information overload.

I spent $150 on Rowley Crossworks non-commercial and a J-Link EDU version, just because it's easy and I don't have to mess with anything. It's about as easy as MPLAB-X, but then again, some of you guys have problems with that.

Whether it's worth it as a hobbyist just depends on the type of projects you do. If you don't need it, you don't need it. Quite frankly some of the 8 bits have gotten rather fast with updated peripherals that are pretty nice.
 
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